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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 8:28 EDT

Lewis’s Woodpecker

The Lewis’s Woodpecker, (Melanerpes lewis), is a large North American species of woodpecker. One of the largest species of American woodpeckers, Lewis’s Woodpecker can be as large as 10 to 11 inches in length. It is mainly blackish-green in color with a black rump. It has a gray collar and upper breast, with a pinkish belly, and a red face. The wings are much broader than those of other woodpeckers, and it flies at a much more sluggish pace with slow, but even flaps similar to those of a crow.

Lewis’s Woodpecker nests in a cavity hollowed out from a dead tree branch. The nest is constructed mainly by the male. The female will lay between 5 and 9 eggs, which are plain white in coloration. Incubation is performed by both sexes, the female sitting during the day and the male sitting at night, and lasts approximately 12 days, after which the young will hatch. The young leave the nest 4 to 5 weeks after hatching.

Lewis’s Woodpecker dwells mostly in open pine woodlands, and other areas with scattered trees. Unlike other American woodpeckers, it enjoys sitting in the open as opposed to sitting in heavy tree cover. It ranges mostly in the western to central United States, but can winter as far south as the US border with Mexico and summer as far north as Canada.

Although Lewis’s Woodpecker does forage for insects by boring into trees with its chisel-like bill, the bird also catches insects in the air during flight, a habit that only one other woodpecker, the Red-headed Woodpecker, engages in. Lewis’s Woodpecker also feeds on berries and nuts, and will even shell and store nuts in cracks and holes in wood to store until winter.

Lewis’s Woodpecker was named for Meriwether Lewis, one of the explorers who surveyed the areas bought by the United States of America during the Louisiana Purchase.

Lewis8217s Woodpecker