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Wahoo

The Wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri), is a dark blue scombrid fish found worldwide in tropical and subtropical seas. Some say that the name “Wahoo” is a derivation of the name of the Hawaiian Island Oahu, while others say the name derives from the exclamation of some fishermen, “Wahoo!” who have hooked into the extremely fast running fish. The fish is also known as Ono, after the Hawaiian word for “delicious”.

The body is elongate and covered with small, scarcely visible, scales; the back is an iridescent blue green, while the sides are silvery, with a pattern of vertical blue bars. These colors fade rapidly at death. The mouth is large, and both the upper and lower jaws have a somewhat sharper appearance than those of King or Spanish Mackerel. Specimens have been recorded at up to 8 feet in length, and weighing up to 180 pounds. Growth can be rapid. One specimen tagged at 11 pounds grew to 33 pounds in one year. Wahoo can swim up to 47 miles per hour.

Wahoos tend to be solitary or occur in loose-knit groups of two or three fish, rather than in schools. Their diet consists essentially of other fish and squid.

Photo Credit: Robbie Cada

Wahoo
Topics: Wahoo, Scombridae


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