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Solar Nebula

Solar Nebula — In astronomy, the solar nebula is the gaseous cloud from which, in the so-called nebular hypothesis of the origin of the solar system, the Sun and planets formed by condensation.

In 1755 the German philosopher Immanuel Kant suggested that a nebula in slow rotation, gradually pulled together by its own gravitational force and flattened into a spinning disk, gave birth to the Sun and planets.

A similar model, but with the planets being formed before the Sun, was proposed by the French astronomer and mathematician Pierre-Simon Laplace in 1796.

During the late 19th century the Kant-Laplace views were criticized by the British physicist James Clerk Maxwell, who showed that, if all the matter contained in the known planets had once been distributed around the Sun in the form of a disk, the shearing forces of differential rotation would have prevented the condensation of individual planets.

Another objection was that the Sun possesses less angular momentum (dependent on the total mass, its distribution, and the speed of rotation) than the theory seemed to require.

For several decades most astronomers preferred the so-called collision theory, in which the planets were considered to have been formed as a result of a close approach to the Sun by some other star.

Objections to the collision theory more convincing than those against the nebular hypothesis were raised, however, especially as the latter was modified in the 1940s.

The mass of the original planet (see protoplanet) was assumed to be larger than in the earlier version of the theory, and the apparent discrepancy in angular momentum was attributed to magnetic forces connecting the Sun and planets.

The nebular hypothesis has thus become the prevailing theory of the origin of the solar system.

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Solar Nebula


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