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Development of Electrofluidic Display Technology (Image 2)

April 30, 2014
Jason Heikenfeld, an assistant professor of electrical engineering the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Engineering and director of the Novel Devices Laboratory at UC, watches doctoral student Linlin Hou work with pigments. Heikenfeld is part of an international collaborative that developed an Electrofluidic Display Technology (EFD), the first technology to electrically switch the appearance of pigments in a manner that provides visual brilliance equal to conventional printed media. The pixel structure in the EFD is able to reveal or hide pigments with high contrast and video speed. It is the first technology to electrically switch the appearance of pigments in a manner that provides visual brilliance equal to conventional printed media. This step toward full-color electronic paper can potentially provide better than 85 percent "white-state reflectance," a performance level required for consumers to accept reflective display applications such as e-books, cell-phones and signage. Development of the technology was an international collaborative effort involving UC, Sun Chemical, Polymer Vision and Gamma Dynamics. The research was supported in part by a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award from the National Science Foundation (ECCS 06-40964). (Date of Image: 2009) Credit: Photo by Dottie Stover


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