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‘Discover Ductless’ Campaign Encouraged Homeowners to try Efficient Ductless Heating and Cooling Systems

February 2, 2012

PORTLAND, Ore., Feb. 2, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA), in collaboration with regional utilities, including Seattle City Light, today announced the winner of the $10,000 grand prize in its Discover Ductless campaign. The campaign, sponsored by Mitsubishi Electric, launched on September 27, 2011, encouraged homeowners to upgrade their inefficient electric heating with ductless heating and cooling systems. These systems heat and cool at a fraction of the cost of electric baseboard and wall heaters, typically saving homeowners 25 to 50 percent on heating bills. Via a random drawing from more than 1,400 entrants, Seattle City Light customer Ross Daniel was awarded $10,000 for participating in the campaign.

“Our old baseboard heaters did not heat our house very evenly,” said Daniel. “I had a ductless system installed in my home this summer and now we are much more comfortable. We are seeing savings on our utility bills and I love it. I was excited to learn that I won the contest, too.”

Starting in 2008, the region’s utilities have taken a leadership role in championing ductless heating and cooling technology. Since that time, ductless heating and cooling systems have proven to be very popular with homeowners for providing an even flow of heat and energy savings. In the last 3 years more than 13,000 ductless heating and cooling systems have been installed in the Northwest, at a savings of 40,500,000 kWh hours per year. That’s enough electricity to power 3,805 average homes for an entire year.

“We’re thrilled that Mr. Daniel not only won the grand prize, but that he also took advantage of Seattle City Light’s ductless heat pump $1,200 rebate for installing a new ductless system,” said Glenn Atwood, Seattle City Light’s director of conservation resources. “His new system should provide him with comfort and electricity savings for many years to come.”

The Discover Ductless campaign’s tagline was: “The 70s Called and They Want Their Heater Back” – comparing the outdated heating, hairstyles and fashion of the 1970s with the more energy-efficient world of 2011. At goingductless.com, residents of Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington could enter to win a $10,000 cash prize, watch funny videos from the King of HVAC and create e-postcards that merged the consumer’s photo with an array of 1970′s hairstyles and backgrounds.

“This campaign is a great example of regional collaboration,” said Alexis Allan, group product manager at NEEA. “Together NEEA and its partner utilities are working to bring the comfort and energy savings of ductless heating and cooling technology to homeowners throughout the region.”

Ninety-two utility partners in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington offer customer rebates on energy-efficient ductless systems – up to $1,500 or up to 40 percent of the cost of an installed ductless heating and cooling system. Ductless heating and cooling systems have the potential to save the Northwest region 200 aMW of energy savings each year–the equivalent to powering more than 150,000 homes each year.

For more information, please visit: www.goingductless.com.


About the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance

The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) is a non-profit organization working to maximize energy efficiency to meet our future energy needs. NEEA is supported by and works in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration, Energy Trust of Oregon and more than 100 Northwest utilities for the benefit of more than 12 million energy consumers. NEEA uses the market power of the region to accelerate the innovation and adoption of energy-efficient products, services and practices. Since 1997, NEEA and its partners have saved enough energy to power more than 568,400 homes each year. Energy efficiency can satisfy more than half of our new demand for energy, saving money, and keeping the Northwest a healthy and vibrant place to live. For more information, visit neea.org.

SOURCE Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance


Source: PR Newswire