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INFOGRAPHIC: Most College Career Center Professionals Aren’t Happy with Career Fair Attendance, Based on Survey by Career Skills Expert Alfred Poor

February 14, 2013

A recent and admittedly unscientific poll asked college career center professionals to share their average attendance at on-campus career fairs, and their reactions to those turnouts. Barely a third reported being Satisfied or Very Happy, while nearly as many said they were Disappointed or Discouraged.

Perkasie, PA (PRWEB) February 14, 2013

Speaker and author Alfred Poor recently conducted a brief (and admittedly unscientific) poll of college career center professionals about student attendance at on-campus career fairs. He asked them to report the average attendance, and their reaction to the turnout. The choices offered were Very Happy, Satisfied, Accepting, Disappointed, and Discouraged.

Responses came from college programs of all sizes, with reported attendance ranging from fewer than 15 up to 2,000 students. Of all the responses, only 35% reported being Satisfied or Very Happy with the turnout. Overall, the average attendance was 370 students.

As might be expected, the staff with larger average turnout tended to be happier. Only 22% of the Satisfied and Very Happy responses came from colleges with average attendance of less than 400 students. Only one college with average turnout greater than 200 reported being Disappointed.

On the other hand, all of the staff who reported being Discouraged had average attendance of less than 100 students.

The poll also asked how much of an increase would be of interest. Of the staff who expressed interest in 100% or greater increase, they had an average attendance of 50 students. This means that on average, they would be interested in getting an additional 50 students to show up. Of those who were interested in a 25% or greater increase, they had an average attendance of 350 students. Increasing their turnout would require an average of 88 more students. And among those who reported being Very Happy with their attendance, all expressed interest in at least a 10% increase. Their average attendance was 750 students, so 75 additional students would be of interest to this segment.

The conclusion is that the vast majority of college career center professionals are not pleased with the turnout that they get for their on-campus career fair events. In addition, it appears that almost all of the staff who responded would be interested in increasing the turnout by 75 to 100 additional students on average.

An infographic that summarizes these results is available at http://alfredpoorspeaker.com/career-fair-survey/.

Career fairs give college students an excellent opportunity to meet with potential employers and learn about various career opportunities with their companies. For a variety of reasons, only a small fraction of the students take advantage of these events.

About Alfred Poor, PhD: He is a writer, speaker, and trainer with a worldwide reputation. He is the author of “7 Success Secrets That Every College Student Needs to Know!” as well as more than a dozen other books. He speaks to college and corporate audiences about how young employees can be more successful in the working world after graduation. He has experience as a guest on television and radio, and was co-host of a live radio show in New York City for more than eight years. He presents his upbeat message with energy and humor, and welcomes the opportunity for live interaction with audience members.

Speaker and author Alfred Poor recently conducted a brief (and admittedly unscientific) poll of college career center professionals about student attendance at on-campus career fairs. He asked them to report the average attendance, and their reaction to the turnout. The choices offered were Very Happy, Satisfied, Accepting, Disappointed, and Discouraged.

Responses came from college programs of all sizes, with reported attendance ranging from fewer than 15 up to 2,000 students. Of all the responses, only 35% reported being Satisfied or Very Happy with the turnout. Overall, the average attendance was 370 students.

As might be expected, the staff with larger average turnout tended to be happier. Only 22% of the Satisfied and Very Happy responses came from colleges with average attendance of less than 400 students. Only one college with average turnout greater than 200 reported being Disappointed.

On the other hand, all of the staff who reported being Discouraged had average attendance of less than 100 students.

The poll also asked how much of an increase would be of interest. Of the staff who expressed interest in 100% or greater increase, they had an average attendance of 50 students. This means that on average, they would be interested in getting an additional 50 students to show up. Of those who were interested in a 25% or greater increase, they had an average attendance of 350 students. Increasing their turnout would require an average of 88 more students. And among those who reported being Very Happy with their attendance, all expressed interest in at least a 10% increase. Their average attendance was 750 students, so 75 additional students would be of interest to this segment.

The conclusion is that the vast majority of college career center professionals are not pleased with the turnout that they get for their on-campus career fair events. In addition, it appears that almost all of the staff who responded would be interested in increasing the turnout by 75 to 100 additional students on average.

An infographic that summarizes these results is available at http://alfredpoorspeaker.com/career-fair-survey/.

Career fairs give college students an excellent opportunity to meet with potential employers and learn about various career opportunities with their companies. For a variety of reasons, only a small fraction of the students take advantage of these events.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2013/2/prweb10425357.htm


Source: prweb



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