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Hagley Museum and Library Presents a Symposium on Intellectual Property

May 9, 2013

On May 16, Dr. Catherine, Fisk Chancellor´s Professor of Law in the School of Law at University of California-Irvine, and Dr. Paul Duguid, School of Information at the University of California-Berkley, will discuss the complicated history behind the creation of intellectual property at Hagley Museum and Library’s symposium.

Wilmington, Delaware (PRWEB) May 09, 2013

Hagley Museum and Library presents Catherine Fisk, Chancellor´s Professor of Law in the School of Law at University of California-Irvine, and Paul Duguid, School of Information at the University of California-Berkley, at its spring symposium on Historicizing Intellectual Property. On May 16, these speakers will discuss the complicated history behind the creation of intellectual property. The symposium begins at 3 p.m. in the Copeland Room at Hagley Library. This program is free and open to the public. Reservations are required: clockman@Hagley.org or 302-658-2400, ext. 243. Use Hagley´s Buck Road entrance off Route 100.

“Intellectual property is one of the most controversial and complex arenas of contemporary litigation and legislation,” says Dr. Roger Horowitz, Director, Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society at Hagley. “By turning ideas and creative products into property that can be bought and sold — and serve as a source for profits — intellectual property has become ever more important in our information economy.”

Catherine Fisk: “Authors Anonymous”

Dr. Fisk will contrast the norms of attribution in twentieth-century advertising with that of motion picture and television writing. Writers in Hollywood, through their union, the Writers Guild of America, created the screen credit system that regulated compensation and gave writers public recognition for their activities. In advertising, by contrast, there was no union and as a result no formal system of attribution.

Paul Duguid: “Brands in Chains”

Dr. Duguid will challenge the general assumption that wars between companies´ brands (such as Pepsi vs. Coke, or Apple vs. Samsung) only take place between these competing firms. Drawing on historical evidence, his presentation argues these conflicts also play out along the supply chains used to create particular branded products.

Commentary following the talks will be given by Philip Scranton, Rutgers University, and David Suisman, University of Delaware.

About the Library

Hagley Library is the nation´s leading business history library, archives, and research center. Current holdings comprise 37,000 linear feet in the Manuscripts and Archives Department, 290,000 printed volumes in the Imprints Department, 2 million visual items in the Pictorial Department, and more than 300,000 digital images and pages in the Digital Archives Department. Hagley´s Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society organizes conferences, research seminars, and a public lecture series; it also operates a research grants-in-aid program.

Hagley Museum and Library

At Hagley, we invite people of all ages to investigate and experience the unfolding history of American business, technology, and innovation, and its impact on the world, from our home at the historic DuPont powder yards on the banks of the Brandywine. For more information, call 302-685-2400 weekdays or visit http://www.hagley.org.

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2013/5/prweb10710359.htm


Source: prweb