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Fewer Elderly Favor Cell Phones on Planes

August 7, 2008

A U.S. Department of Transportation survey indicates Americans don’t like the idea of people using cell phones on airplanes.

But those ages 18 to 34 are less likely to oppose the idea.

The Bureau of Transportation Statistics reported 39.7 percent of those who responded to the November 2007 survey said passengers should definitely or probably be allowed to use cell phone, providing they don’t interfere with aircraft communications systems. A larger proportion, however, 45.2 percent said cell phone use should or probably be prohibited.

The data came from BTS’ annual Omnibus Household Survey conducted in November 2006 and November 2007 and had an error margin for the 2007 cell phone questions of 3.1 percentage points. Nine-hundred-79 households were queried in 2007.

“Younger respondents were most likely to support cell phone use. In 2007, almost half (47.7 percent) of respondents between 18 and 34 said passengers should definitely or probably be allowed to use cell phones while fewer than four out of 10 (36.1 percent) said they definitely or probably should not be used,” the report said.

“Among those over age 65, about one out of four (26.6 percent) said passengers should definitely or probably be allowed to use cell phones while more than half (56.7 percent) said they definitely or probably should not be used.”

About 40 percent of the 35-64 age group favored cell phone use while 45.6 percent were opposed, the report said.




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