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The Haagen-Dazs Brand Salutes the Obamas for Their White House Garden and Beehive

March 25, 2009

Superpremium Ice cream Maker Pledges to Donate Two Million Flower Seeds to Help Create More Bee Habitats

OAKLAND, Calif., March 25 /PRNewswire/ — The new vegetable and herb garden at the White House will not only provide produce for the First Family, but will also be an important food source for honey bees. Without the bees, the fruits in the garden may not be adequately pollinated. The Haagen-Dazs brand today announced its goal of distributing two million bee-friendly flower seeds in 2009, encouraging other American families to follow the Obama’s lead to plant gardens and help these important pollinators.

Honey bees are responsible for one out of every three bites of food every American takes. Nearly 50 percent of Haagen-Dazs ice cream flavors are “bee-built” and made with bee-dependent ingredients. But there’s a problem. Over the last three winters one in three honey bee colonies in the U.S. has died, and scientists are still working to figure out the cause of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). One way to help these important pollinators is to increase their access to nutrition by planting plants and flowers that are a good source of pollen and nectar.

“The First Family has set a great example for Americans,” said Haagen-Dazs brand manager Ching-Yee Hu. “It not only shows everyone the importance of backyard gardens and knowing how food gets to your table, but also let’s everyone know that bees are important and they need our help.”

Last year the Haagen-Dazs brand exceeded its goal of distributing one million bee-friendly plant seeds and gave more than 1.2 million to community groups like school organizations, garden clubs and private organizations looking to do their part. To request bee-friendly seeds from the Haagen-Dazs brand, consumers can send their request to hdloveshb@gmail.com; supplies are limited.

The brand encourages everyone to find a way to become a bee crusader in 2009. Do your part to help save the honey bees. Here’s how you can make a difference:

  • Create a bee friendly garden with plants that attract honey bees. Select a plant with a long growing season or a group of plants that together will offer flowers from spring through fall. A great resource for information can be found at www.helpthehoneybees.com, or from the horticulturalist at your local plant nursery.
  • Avoid insecticides in your garden. Instead, promote good bugs (called ‘beneficial insects’) in your garden – bugs that will happily eat the bad bugs chomping on your plants. A comprehensive resource for information is www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/ and http://horticulture.psu.edu/extension/mg
  • Every time you buy a Haagen-Dazs ice cream bee-built product, a portion of the proceeds of the sale go toward helping the honey bees.
  • Tell a friend – The honey bee disappearance is already having an effect on the world’s most beloved foods. However, many people have yet to learn about this issue and how they can help. Visit www.helpthehoneybees.com to send a Bee-Mail or to create your own animated honey bee to help spread the word.
  • Visit the Haagen-Dazs Bee Store at www.helpthehoneybees.com – All proceeds from our bee store will fund CCD and sustainable pollination research at Penn State and UC Davis.

For full details on how the Haagen-Dazs brand is helping honey bees and how you can take part, please visit www.helpthehoneybees.com.

About Haagen-Dazs

Crafted in 1960 by Reuben Mattus in his family’s dairy, Haagen-Dazs is the original superpremium ice cream. True to tradition, we are committed to using only the purest ingredients in crafting the world’s finest ice cream. Truly made like no other, today Haagen-Dazs ice cream offers a full range of products from ice cream to sorbet, frozen yogurt and frozen snacks in more than 65 flavors. Haagen-Dazs products are available around the globe for ice cream lovers to enjoy. For more information, please visit www.Haagen-Dazs.com.

SOURCE Haagen-Dazs


Source: newswire



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