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As Temperatures Rise, Arizona American Water Reminds Customers to Stay Hydrated

July 20, 2010

PHOENIX, July 20 /PRNewswire/ — Arizona American Water reminds customers to stay hydrated as summer temperatures soar.

The human body is more than 60 percent water. Even mild dehydration can reduce a person’s work capacity by 12 to 15 percent, affecting physical and mental functioning. Dehydration can lead to poor decision making, accidents and injury. Continued exposure to heat without proper hydration can lead to an electrolyte imbalance, muscle cramps and eventually heat stroke.

Medical experts agree that men should have more than 13 eight-ounce glasses of water a day and women need nine. Pregnant women and nursing mothers may need more. Keep in mind that the ideal amount varies with the individual and conditions such as activity.

Keeping hydrated is also vital during periods of physical exertion. Experts recommend drinking two cups of water one to two hours before exercising followed by another two cups 10 to 15 minutes before. Drink a half a cup every 15 minutes while exercising and two cups or more afterward for every pound lost through sweat. According to health experts, proper hydration can also serve as a safe and natural appetite suppressant, which is good news for dieters.

Arizona American Water, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), is the largest investor-owned water utility in the state, providing high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 350,000 people.

Founded in 1886, American Water is the largest investor-owned U.S. water and wastewater utility company. With headquarters in Voorhees, N.J., the company employs more than 7,000 dedicated professionals who provide drinking water, wastewater and other related services to approximately 16 million people in 35 states, as well as Ontario and Manitoba, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.

SOURCE Arizona American Water


Source: newswire



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