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“Vacuum Cleaner Does Not Lose Suction” Myth Busted by GoodVac.com

July 9, 2011

Very often vacuum cleaner commercials emphasize on powerful suction or no suction loss over the time. GoodVac.com has done the research and concluded that while these claims may be true, suction is not the single most important factor that should be considered when shopping for a new sweeper. A lot of physical parameters are at work here and they have to come together at a ratio that is just right in order for the appliance to be an effective “dirt sucking machine”.

Palos Park, IL (PRWEB) July 08, 2011

GoodVac.com specializes in high end cleaning systems and sales representatives have to answer question “which vacuum has the best suction?” very often. However the “best suction” does not define the best vacuum.

One of the most powerful vehicles in the world is NASA’s 3000 ton crawler-transporter used to transport space shuttles and burning 125 gallons of fuel per mile. So while the crawler-transporter is very powerful it may not be the best choice for such tasks as getting some furniture to a storage unit or picking up kids from school (they’d love it of course). Getting a sweeper with the most powerful suction may not be the best solution for the cleaning job you need it to do either. To an average consumer “good vacuum cleaner” and “suction” seem to have a very direct correlation and this has become over-exploited in the industry advertisements. Popular examples are videos of Oreck vacuum lifting a bowling ball and some manufacturers have pushed the limits of sanity and lifted a car. This is very impressive but is not much more than using a huge suction cup on a smooth surface to hold a heavy item.

Vacuums never losing suction.

Claims that a vacuum “never loses suction” are true but usually refer to “sealed suction” when measurement is taken completely closing the intake and stopping the airflow. Even if a vacuum bag or HEPA filter is clogged, as long as there is even a tiny air passage between the fan system and the chamber where the suction measurement is taken, the vacuum will uniformly lower the pressure within the entire sealed system. Therefore such measurement by itself is useless if air is not moving (or not moving fast enough) to supply the necessary momentum to the dirt particles to make a complete journey from floors to filter bag. This is where airflow comes into the play. Measured in volume of air per unit of time, airflow is another important factor as well as the speed at which the air is moving.

Vacuum cleaners have a lot to do with “rocket science” quite literally and the earlier analogy with NASA’s crawler-transporter is not only thing that makes vacuum cleaners related to rocket science. It is very important how the air is moving within the vacuum just like it is important how it is moving around the space shuttle. Of course many more things must be taken into consideration such as brush roller design, filtration, ergonomics, ease of use, cost of consumables, cost of parts and repair and finally the price of the system.

While tackling a variety of surfaces, customer preferences and marketing techniques, manufacturers themselves are still in a search of the perfect vacuum that does not yet exist. So one should not embark on a year long quest in the search for the perfect vacuum. When buying your next sweeper leave science to scientists, arm yourself with a healthy dose of skepticism to unearthly claims. Read reviews by other consumers use common sense and talk to the person who does your cleaning because his/her preference will matter a lot.

GoodVac.com, Corp specializes in high end vacuum cleaners parts and accessories (Kirby, Rainbow, Filterqueen, Tristar) since 2002. We also carry Oreck sweepers and various steamers and humidifiers. Please visit vacuum buyer guide / feature explanation.

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Source: prweb