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Plants-Pedia.com Has the Answers to Everything you Would Ever Want to Know About Plants in North America

July 22, 2011

SANTA BARBARA, Calif., July 22, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — Choosing the right plant for your garden can be a daunting task, but with this new online comparison tool you can sift through 48,000 plants from the USDA plants database and narrow down your choices, complete with charts and images. You can filter by growth period, soil texture, lifespan, shade tolerance, toxicity, and more. This tool is simple enough for the average gardener to use but has enough advanced options to be useful to even the most experienced botanist. Interested in trekking into the wilderness and cutting down your own Christmas tree? Check out the list of 32 plants commonly used as Christmas trees. Want blossoms all year long? Check out a list of winter flowering plants that will keep your garden colorful year-round. If you want to make sure your garden is full of edible berries and seeds, check out the list of over 100 options.

Toxic Plants

Whenever you’re in the market for a new landscape, one thing you should always be aware of is plant toxicity. This database allows you to sort toxicity levels from none to severe. There are 34 plants that you should stay away from; though many have beautiful blossoms, the effects of accidental contact or consumption could be severe.

Drought Tolerant Plants

Do you live in an area where 100 degree F summer days are the norm? You may think nothing can survive in that environment, but there are over 400 plants in the database with high drought tolerance. No shade? No problem. With over 900 plants labeled as intolerant to shade, you will have plenty to choose from. If you live in the other extreme and are not foreign to negative temperatures, you can sort plants by minimum temperature.

Fire Resistant Plants

If you live in an area that is prone to wildfires, then you might want to look for plants that are fire resistant. The words “fire resistance” and “plants” aren’t usually found in the same sentence, but surprisingly there are over 600 plants that are labeled by the USDA as being highly resistant to fire.

SOURCE Plants-Pedia.com


Source: newswire



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