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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 8:28 EDT

‘Seniorizing’ the Homes of Elder Loved Ones Aging in Place: DIY Tips from Senior Care Corner

June 6, 2012

Today´s seniors and those of tomorrow want to live in their own homes as long as possible. Many, however, plan to live in homes that are not designed or furnished to meet the needs of aging bodies. Senior Care Corner has several do-it-yourself projects and tasks family members can do to make their elder loved ones´ homes safer and more comfortable as they´re aging in place.

Greenville, SC (PRWEB) June 06, 2012

Today´s seniors and those of tomorrow want to live in their own homes as long as possible, up to 90 percent according to survey after survey. At the same time, whether by choice or out of economic necessity, many plan to live in homes that are not designed or furnished to meet the needs of aging bodies. Senior Care Corner has several do-it-yourself projects and tasks family members can do on weekends or a summer vacation to make their elder loved ones´ homes safer and more comfortable as they´re aging in place.

“We´re torn when aging loved ones want to live alone in their homes out of concern for their health and safety,” says Barry Birkett of Senior Care Corner, “Fortunately there are many small projects we can do to adapt their homes to better meet their needs.”

When shopping to meet the needs of growing families, few homebuyers consider what they may need 20, 30 or more years down the road. Many features that make homes attractive to younger buyers, such as upstairs bedrooms, decorative kitchen cabinet hardware and wood floors, can be inconvenient or even hazardous for owners whose bodies experience aging.

Senior Care Corner developed their Home Seniorization Checklist of projects and important steps, many easily overlooked, to help family members make the homes of their senior loved ones more accommodating to those choosing the aging in place option.

Kitchen

  •     Examine kitchen cabinets and make sure items used regularly are within easy reach to prevent injuries due to stretching or climbing.
  •     Replace decorative drawer and cabinet handles with styles that are easier for aging hands to grasp and pull.
  •     Make sure there is an up-to-date and easy to use fire extinguisher within close reach of the stove.

Bedroom

  •     Move furniture with corners/edges away from the bed to reduce the possibility of injury from a fall getting out of bed.
  •     Remove or secure throw rugs to prevent slipping or tripping on them.

Bathroom

  •     Install grab bars in tub and toilet areas.
  •     Set water heater to 120 degrees or less to prevent scalding.
  •     Install a raised toilet seat or taller toilet for ease in access.

General Living Areas

  •     Add night lights throughout the home to reduce the risk of injury walking in a dark home.
  •     Purchase wireless or cell phones that may be carried through the home to be at hand in emergency and avoid injury rushing to answer calls.
  •     Remove or relocate electrical cords that can be tripping hazards.

Outside the Home

  •     Inspect walkways and driveway, repairing any areas that present a tripping hazard.
  •     Check to see that all steps, including those into doorways, are not high enough to be a tripping hazard for seniors carrying items; install ramps if needed.

These suggestions and more are on the downloadable Home Seniorization Checklist at SeniorCareCorner.com.

About Senior Care Corner

Senior Care Corner (on the web at SeniorCareCorner.com) provides solutions, information and tools to family caregivers and others who care for and about senior adults to help them improve the lives of the seniors in their lives. Their blog, biweekly podcast and bookstore address a wide variety of topics family caregivers can use to better understand the wants and needs of their senior loved ones

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/6/prweb9574629.htm


Source: prweb