Quantcast

What’s Happening In Your School District? What’s Happening In Your School District?

August 17, 2008

By Meadows, Robyn

Manheim Central Manheim Township Penn Manor Pequea Valley Solanco Warwick Cocalico Columbia Conestoga Valley Donegal Eastern Lancaster County Elizabethtown Ephrata Hempfield Lampeter-Strasburg Lancaster Manheim Central Manheim Township Penn Manor Pequea Valley Solanco Warwick What’s new: reading programs, laptops, a kindergarten center, Chinese-language classes and construction.

Also, fresh faces.

Consider four new superintendents, several new principals and dozens of new teachers.

So if you want to know what’s up for the new year in your school, see below:

A reading program has been adopted in grades K-6.

Also, every school building is now equipped with one point of entry and is secured with audio and video monitors. Visitors will have to provide identification and the purpose of their visit before they enter.

The district set up a Web-based communication system to reach families during emergencies and major changes.

The district has also launched a Web-based remediation program.

This year, 12 new teachers come on board throughout the district.

The elementary schools will start a new reading program this year. At the secondary level, a Career Choices curriculum is being implemented.

Also in the secondary schools, students will have new math textbooks.

The school board will consider a feasibility study on renovations to the high school tonight.

There are eight new teachers.

High school students can take online Latin classes this year.

The district is also expanding its cyber academy from K-9 to K- 10.

This year, technology is making its way into the elementary schools.

The district is funding technology enhancements for 5th- and 6th- grade classrooms and in some middle school classrooms.

Each of the affected rooms will have a digital projector, teacher laptop and an electronic whiteboard.

The district has also named some new leaders.

Bill Feeley has been hired as the new math supervisor. Chris Smith will start as the assistant technology manager.

The school district is still in the process of hiring a special education supervisor and an assistant high school principal. There are 19 new teachers.

The expansion of computer and business classes is coming to the upper elementary school grades and middle school.

This will prepare students to take more in-depth computer and business classes when they reach high school.

The district is also launching a new math program, Everyday Mathematics, in grades K-5.

Donegal has hired four new administrators. They are Judith Higgins, human resources director; Winnifred Younkin, assistant curriculum and instruction director; Jeresther Thorpe-Page, assistant principal at Donegal Springs Elementary; and Ellen Castagneto, director of special education and student services.

The district also has hired 19 new teachers; three are long-term substitutes.

Kindergarten will no longer be held at the elementary schools; instead, the little ones will go to school at their own center located inside the former Learning Ladder facility.

This year, construction on additional parking and a girl’s softball field will begin at Donegal Springs Elementary.

The district wants to plan a comprehensive construction project that would require residents to approve it with a vote sometime in the 2008-09 school year.

The high school has shifted to block scheduling.

Students will have four classes per day that are 80 minutes long.

The district made the switch to block scheduling to provide teachers with more time to teach, said Superintendent Robert Hollister, adding it is also more “efficient.”

“A science experiment won’t take two days,” he said. “It will take one day.”

Speaking of science, instead of just learning from a textbook, elementary students will experience science hands-on through experiments this year.

Meanwhile, a districtwide analysis of facilities found significant needs at the middle and high schools. An architect is working on plans for upgrades.

Leadership roles have changed.

Hollister is the new superintendent. He replaces Saundra Hoover, who retired.

LynMarie Hilt is the new principal of Brecknock Elementary School.

The district has also hired 16 new teachers and long-term substitutes.

Technology is headed to the secondary classrooms. Think electronic whiteboards and laptops.

Many changes are happening behind the scenes.

Teachers and administrators will begin using a program called Performance Tracker that will streamline test data, allowing them to look at a student’s performance in a particular area.

Community Relations Director Troy Portser said teachers will undergo training to align what they are teaching with state standards and district goals.

“The students absolutely will benefit,” Portser said.

Several key administrators take on new positions this year.

Former Assistant Superintendent Amy Slamp is the new superintendent.

Richard Schwarzman, former director for schools and learning, is the assistant to the superintendent for secondary education.

New to the district is Michele Balliet, the assistant superintendent for elementary education.

The district has hired 14 new teachers.

Portser said the district hopes to break ground on a new $29 million intermediate center in November or December.

With the opening of a 5th- and 6th-grade Intermediate School, the four elementary schools will house students in grades K-4 and the middle school will house grades 7 and 8.

This year, high school students will have the opportunity to take new art, business and college-prep courses. They can learn Mandarin Chinese with a distance learning class.

Sophomores who need help preparing for standardized tests can take a “literacy strategies” course.

Graduation requirements have changed beginning with this year’s sophomores, the Class of 2011. Physical education classes are mandatory for all four years and sophomores must take a safety course.

Several new administrators start this year.

Jean Hornberger will serve as the business manager. Robin Felty is the new assistant superintendent for secondary education.

Kristin Holst will be the new assistant principal at the high school.

In addition, the district hired 12 new teachers.

Officials hope to have finished or nearly completed two construction projects by the start of the school year.

The middle school will have a renovated gym and cafeteria along with the fifth- and sixth-grade wing.

The 47-year-old high school building will have air conditioning and enough lockers for every student.

District officials are sending teachers to class.

The district is partnering with the University of Virginia to write a graduate course for teachers.

Robert O’Donnell, assistant superintendent for elementary education, said the courses teach instructors to tailor lessons to suit students’ individual needs.

In the meantime, high school students can take an introductory engineering course in conjunction with Penn State University.

They can also take third-year-level Chinese.

The high school is moving to block scheduling. Students will take four 80-minute classes a semester.

Fewer classes with longer class periods will allow teachers to vary their instruction methods and give them more time to learn students’ strengths and weaknesses and personalize feedback, said Chris Adams, assistant superintendent of secondary education, who has been promoted from high school principal.

He replaces O’Donnell who moved to the elementary post.

Will Stout will replace Adams as high school principal and Ryan Axe will serve as ninth-grade house principal.

James Gague will be the new principal at Centerville Middle School and Tab Musser will be the assistant principal.

Ron Swantner will serve as the principal for the Landisville Primary Center.

Students will see 26 new teachers.

Assistant Superintendent Kevin Peart said elementary science courses are being updated to help students prepare for the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment.

High school students can take an entry-level Mandarin Chinese course during the fall semester and a second level during the spring semester, if there’s enough interest.

The school will also offer a new music class, with the goal of adding an AP music course.

High school students will have more opportunities to earn college credit this year.

Lampeter-Strasburg is expanding its dual-enrollment program to allow students to take classes at the Pennsylvania College of Art & Design.

Students also can earn college credits in social studies and English without leaving the campus.

The district, through Harrisburg Area Community College, is offering the College in High School program. High school teachers, approved by HACC as adjunct professors, will teach the courses.

The district has also beefed up technology with the purchase of 300 new computers, the majority for elementary schools.

The district has also reorganized all of its elementary schools.

Lampeter Elementary will hold students in K-2, as will Strasburg Elementary. Hans Herr School will become an intermediate center, geared toward students in grades 3, 4 and 5.

Students at Hans Herr will see one new face this year, Assistant Principal Jeffrey Smecker.

The district hired 20 new teachers; six served as long-term substitutes or part-time employees in the district.

A Chinese course will be offered at Ross and Wharton elementary schools, John Reynolds Middle School and on the high school campus. The district also has new art, music and early-childhood curriculums.

And it has new faces.

Pedro Rivera is the new superintendent.

District officials are also looking for a new principal for McCaskey East High School.

The district hired 32 new teachers this year.

Lancaster is opening an early childhood center, which will host six classes of 3- and 4-year-olds.

And, officials look to begin construction on the first phase of a $198 million construction project.

A program for ninth-grade students interested in technology, but not in school, is expanding.

This year, sophomores who were enrolled in the program last year will spend a whole day at the Lancaster County Career and Technology Center’s Mount Joy Campus.

Incoming freshmen enrolled will spend half the day at the campus. The district is building the program one year at a time.

The long-range plan is for students to finish the CTC experience by the end of their junior year, Superintendent Carol Saylor said. Then they would spend their senior year either at a trade school/ junior college or on the job.

Multiple changes have been made to the administrative staff.

Scott Deisley has been named assistant superintendent. Van Artsdalen, coming from 17 years experience at Bermudian Springs Middle School, will be the new middle school principal, replacing Deisley.

Former middle school assistant principal Shane Mack will be looped to the high school.

Michelle Saylor replaces Mack at the middle school. James Hale is the new principal at Burgard Elementary, after 12 years at Steelton- Highspire Elementary in Dauphin County.

Nine teacher positions will be replaced this year.

The new Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics program – known as STEM – will become part of electives offered at the high school.

STEM labs will open in the fall, along with two introductory engineering courses – Intro to Engineering and Principals of Engineering. The courses are designed to prepare students interested in pursuing technology and engineering fields in college, said Joey Rider, chairman of the science department.

Students have the math and science behind it but are in need of more hands-on experience, Rider said.

The STEM labs will offer high-tech facilities equipped with 3-D computer models for students to use to solve realistic engineering and technological problems.

Rider said the district will add more advanced courses to the STEM curriculum every year.

A new planetarium has been completed and is ready for use in the high school’s new astronomy course.

The 30-by-30-by-30-foot building is attached to the high school near the new auditorium and music suites, Rider said. It replaces an old metal dome shut down years ago.

“We essentially have an IMAX capability system within our building,” Rider said.

In addition, the high school television studio will open in time for the spring semester.

Robert “Gene” Freeman leads the list of new faces in the school district. He replaces Kevin Singer as superintendent.

The district will see 40 new teachers.

Christopher Zander is the new assistant principal at Nitrauer Elementary. Kristen Rychener, previously on special assignment for the district, will assume a part-time assistant principal position at Reidenbaugh Elementary.

After hearing hammers for the past few years, the high school construction project will finish around November. The $18.4 million Bucher Elementary School construction project will begin later in the school year.

High school students can take three new courses this year: Theater Arts, Video Game Design and History of U.S. Immigration (1787-present).

The school will incorporate items like classroom blogs into the online curriculum.

Millersville University will join with Penn Manor in a year-long series of cyber and Internet safety workshops.

Penn Manor added an elementary reading coach who will support the elementary teachers.

Martic Elementary will close this year for renovations. The $6.5 million project, scheduled to finish by Aug. 1, 2009, requires partial roof replacement and extensive masonry work.

The 364 Martic Elementary students will stay in both portable and regular classrooms at Marticville Middle School.

An $11.4 million renovation project on the middle school will be completed by the first day of classes, Aug. 25.

The district has hired 17 new teachers.

High school students will no longer have block scheduling.

Instead, they will have a trimester format.

“Block scheduling made it possible for students to go long periods of time without taking a math course,” said Eric Dreibelbis, director of curriculum and instruction.

“They would perform well in classwork…,” he said. But they labored on the state assessment test, “because they’d been out of the classes for too long.”

Courses under the new format will run 60 days and some practical arts classes will divide into two sessions to adapt to the new schedule.

Look for enrichment courses, too, such as robotics, anatomy and physiology.

In the meantime, Dreibelbis said the district’s new strategic plan will target ways to improve attendance, graduation rates and SAT scores.

There are some changes in leadership.

Jenny LeSage, previously the Pequea Valley Middle School assistant principal, will take over as special education coordinator at the high school. Taylor Croft fills in LeSage’s old post.

Dreibelbis said Pequea Valley is still hiring teachers, but expects to bring in about 14 new faces.

More changes will come after winter break when the new Paradise Elementary School opens its doors.

The southern-end school district will see some new leaders.

Robert J. Dangler will become principal at Bart-Colerain Elementary School, replacing Thomas E. Brackbill, who retired. Paul E. Gladfelter takes over Dangler’s old post as assistant principal of Smith and Swift middle schools.

Shirley F. Hunter fills in Brackbill’s other position as director of elementary education.

Scott Van Vooren will take over as assistant principal at the high school. David Ludwig is the food service director.

The school district is conducting a feasibility study of facilities such as building capacity, classroom adequacy, energy efficiency and security.

The new K-12 curriculum in the area of school counseling goes into effect this year. It focuses on anti-bullying, social skills and respect, with attention to racial conflict.

Its goal: Encourage students to report bullying and intimidation and help teachers spot trouble sooner.

The district is continuing with its No Place for Hate programs with the Anti-Defamation League.

The high school also will continue its student exchange program with McCaskey High School in Lancaster.

A high school science classroom will have an interactive whiteboard, projector, computers for the classroom and teacher. The district will also buy digital cameras.

The district has hired 17 new teachers.

This is the first full year for the district’s rapid emergency response system. The program sends messages to parents and staff in the event of an emergency and for early release days.

Robert Lombardo has been named as acting superintendent, replacing John George, who resigned.

Jill M. Hackman has been named acting assistant superintendent in Lombardo’s place.

Melanie Calender has been named acting director of student services, replacing Hackman.

Susan Logan is an assistant principal at the high school. Last year, her title was assistant to the principal.

Scott Galen also has been named assistant principal at the high school, a new position.

Renovation and construction began in June on Warwick Middle School.

The construction will not impact students.

(Staff writers Liz Navratil, Dan Rorabaugh and Stephen Zook contributed to this report.)

Staff writer Robyn Meadows can be reached at rmeadows@LNPnews.com or 481-6025.

New faces, new technology, new classes, new construction will greet many county students as they return from summer vacation.

By ROBYN MEADOWS

What’s new: reading programs, laptops, a kindergarten center, Chinese-language classes and construction.

Also, fresh faces.

Consider four new superintendents, several new principals and dozens of new teachers.

So if you want to know what’s up for the new year in your school, see below:

A reading program has been adopted in grades K-6.

Also, every school building is now equipped with one point of entry and is secured with audio and video monitors. Visitors will have to provide identification and the purpose of their visit before they enter.

The district set up a Web-based communication system to reach families during emergencies and major changes.

The district has also launched a Web-based remediation program.

This year, 12 new teachers come on board throughout the district.

The elementary schools will start a new reading program this year. At the secondary level, a Career Choices curriculum is being implemented.

Also in the secondary schools, students will have new math textbooks.

The school board will consider a feasibility study on renovations to the high school tonight.

There are eight new teachers.

High school students can take online Latin classes this year.

The district is also expanding its cyber academy from K-9 to K- 10.

This year, technology is making its way into the elementary schools.

The district is funding technology enhancements for 5th- and 6th- grade classrooms and in some middle school classrooms.

Each of the affected rooms will have a digital projector, teacher laptop and an electronic whiteboard.

The district has also named some new leaders.

Bill Feeley has been hired as the new math supervisor. Chris Smith will start as the assistant technology manager.

The school district is still in the process of hiring a special education supervisor and an assistant high school principal. There are 19 new teachers.

The expansion of computer and business classes is coming to the upper elementary school grades and middle school. This will prepare students to take more in-depth computer and business classes when they reach high school.

The district is also launching a new math program, Everyday Mathematics, in grades K-5.

Donegal has hired four new administrators. They are Judith Higgins, human resources director; Winnifred Younkin, assistant curriculum and instruction director; Jeresther Thorpe-Page, assistant principal at Donegal Springs Elementary; and Ellen Castagneto, director of special education and student services.

The district also has hired 19 new teachers; three are long-term substitutes.

Kindergarten will no longer be held at the elementary schools; instead, the little ones will go to school at their own center located inside the former Learning Ladder facility.

This year, construction on additional parking and a girl’s softball field will begin at Donegal Springs Elementary.

The district wants to plan a comprehensive construction project that would require residents to approve it with a vote sometime in the 2008-09 school year.

The high school has shifted to block scheduling.

Students will have four classes per day that are 80 minutes long.

The district made the switch to block scheduling to provide teachers with more time to teach, said Superintendent Robert Hollister, adding it is also more “efficient.”

“A science experiment won’t take two days,” he said. “It will take one day.”

Speaking of science, instead of just learning from a textbook, elementary students will experience science hands-on through experiments this year.

Meanwhile, a districtwide analysis of facilities found significant needs at the middle and high schools. An architect is working on plans for upgrades.

Leadership roles have changed.

Hollister is the new superintendent. He replaces Saundra Hoover, who retired.

LynMarie Hilt is the new principal of Brecknock Elementary School.

The district has also hired 16 new teachers and long-term substitutes.

Technology is headed to the secondary classrooms. Think electronic whiteboards and laptops.

Many changes are happening behind the scenes.

Teachers and administrators will begin using a program called Performance Tracker that will streamline test data, allowing them to look at a student’s performance in a particular area.

Community Relations Director Troy Portser said teachers will undergo training to align what they are teaching with state standards and district goals.

“The students absolutely will benefit,” Portser said.

Several key administrators take on new positions this year.

Former Assistant Superintendent Amy Slamp is the new superintendent.

Richard Schwarzman, former director for schools and learning, is the assistant to the superintendent for secondary education.

New to the district is Michele Balliet, the assistant superintendent for elementary education.

The district has hired 14 new teachers.

Portser said the district hopes to break ground on a new $29 million intermediate center in November or December.

With the opening of a 5th- and 6th-grade Intermediate School, the four elementary schools will house students in grades K-4 and the middle school will house grades 7 and 8.

This year, high school students will have the opportunity to take new art, business and college-prep courses. They can learn Mandarin Chinese with a distance learning class.

Sophomores who need help preparing for standardized tests can take a “literacy strategies” course.

Graduation requirements have changed beginning with this year’s sophomores, the Class of 2011. Physical education classes are mandatory for all four years and sophomores must take a safety course.

Several new administrators start this year.

Jean Hornberger will serve as the business manager. Robin Felty is the new assistant superintendent for secondary education.

Kristin Holst will be the new assistant principal at the high school.

In addition, the district hired 12 new teachers.

Officials hope to have finished or nearly completed two construction projects by the start of the school year.

The middle school will have a renovated gym and cafeteria along with the fifth- and sixth-grade wing.

The 47-year-old high school building will have air conditioning and enough lockers for every student.

District officials are sending teachers to class.

The district is partnering with the University of Virginia to write a graduate course for teachers.

Robert O’Donnell, assistant superintendent for elementary education, said the courses teach instructors to tailor lessons to suit students’ individual needs.

In the meantime, high school students can take an introductory engineering course in conjunction with Penn State University.

They can also take third-year-level Chinese.

The high school is moving to block scheduling. Students will take four 80-minute classes a semester.

Fewer classes with longer class periods will allow teachers to vary their instruction methods and give them more time to learn students’ strengths and weaknesses and personalize feedback, said Chris Adams, assistant superintendent of secondary education, who has been promoted from high school principal.

He replaces O’Donnell who moved to the elementary post.

Will Stout will replace Adams as high school principal and Ryan Axe will serve as ninth-grade house principal.

James Gague will be the new principal at Centerville Middle School and Tab Musser will be the assistant principal.

Ron Swantner will serve as the principal for the Landisville Primary Center.

Students will see 26 new teachers.

Assistant Superintendent Kevin Peart said elementary science courses are being updated to help students prepare for the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment.

High school students can take an entry-level Mandarin Chinese course during the fall semester and a second level during the spring semester, if there’s enough interest.

The school will also offer a new music class, with the goal of adding an AP music course.

High school students will have more opportunities to earn college credit this year.

Lampeter-Strasburg is expanding its dual-enrollment program to allow students to take classes at the Pennsylvania College of Art & Design.

Students also can earn college credits in social studies and English without leaving the campus.

The district, through Harrisburg Area Community College, is offering the College in High School program. High school teachers, approved by HACC as adjunct professors, will teach the courses.

The district has also beefed up technology with the purchase of 300 new computers, the majority for elementary schools.

The district has also reorganized all of its elementary schools.

Lampeter Elementary will hold students in K-2, as will Strasburg Elementary. Hans Herr School will become an intermediate center, geared toward students in grades 3, 4 and 5.

Students at Hans Herr will see one new face this year, Assistant Principal Jeffrey Smecker.

The district hired 20 new teachers; six served as long-term substitutes or part-time employees in the district.

A Chinese course will be offered at Ross and Wharton elementary schools, John Reynolds Middle School and on the high school campus.

The district also has new art, music and early-childhood curriculums.

And it has new faces.

Pedro Rivera is the new superintendent.

District officials are also looking for a new principal for McCaskey East High School.

The district hired 32 new teachers this year.

Lancaster is opening an early childhood center, which will host six classes of 3- and 4-year-olds.

And, officials look to begin construction on the first phase of a $198 million construction project.

A program for ninth-grade students interested in technology, but not in school, is expanding.

This year, sophomores who were enrolled in the program last year will spend a whole day at the Lancaster County Career and Technology Center’s Mount Joy Campus.

Incoming freshmen enrolled will spend half the day at the campus. The district is building the program one year at a time.

The long-range plan is for students to finish the CTC experience by the end of their junior year, Superintendent Carol Saylor said. Then they would spend their senior year either at a trade school/ junior college or on the job.

Multiple changes have been made to the administrative staff.

Scott Deisley has been named assistant superintendent. Van Artsdalen, coming from 17 years experience at Bermudian Springs Middle School, will be the new middle school principal, replacing Deisley.

Former middle school assistant principal Shane Mack will be looped to the high school.

Michelle Saylor replaces Mack at the middle school. James Hale is the new principal at Burgard Elementary, after 12 years at Steelton- Highspire Elementary in Dauphin County.

Nine teacher positions will be replaced this year.

The new Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics program – known as STEM – will become part of electives offered at the high school.

STEM labs will open in the fall, along with two introductory engineering courses – Intro to Engineering and Principals of Engineering. The courses are designed to prepare students interested in pursuing technology and engineering fields in college, said Joey Rider, chairman of the science department.

Students have the math and science behind it but are in need of more hands-on experience, Rider said.

The STEM labs will offer high-tech facilities equipped with 3-D computer models for students to use to solve realistic engineering and technological problems.

Rider said the district will add more advanced courses to the STEM curriculum every year.

A new planetarium has been completed and is ready for use in the high school’s new astronomy course.

The 30-by-30-by-30-foot building is attached to the high school near the new auditorium and music suites, Rider said. It replaces an old metal dome shut down years ago.

“We essentially have an IMAX capability system within our building,” Rider said.

In addition, the high school television studio will open in time for the spring semester. Robert “Gene” Freeman leads the list of new faces in the school district. He replaces Kevin Singer as superintendent.

The district will see 40 new teachers.

Christopher Zander is the new assistant principal at Nitrauer Elementary. Kristen Rychener, previously on special assignment for the district, will assume a part-time assistant principal position at Reidenbaugh Elementary.

After hearing hammers for the past few years, the high school construction project will finish around November. The $18.4 million Bucher Elementary School construction project will begin later in the school year.

High school students can take three new courses this year: Theater Arts, Video Game Design and History of U.S. Immigration (1787-present).

The school will incorporate items like classroom blogs into the online curriculum.

Millersville University will join with Penn Manor in a year-long series of cyber and Internet safety workshops.

Penn Manor added an elementary reading coach who will support the elementary teachers.

Martic Elementary will close this year for renovations. The $6.5 million project, scheduled to finish by Aug. 1, 2009, requires partial roof replacement and extensive masonry work.

The 364 Martic Elementary students will stay in both portable and regular classrooms at Marticville Middle School.

An $11.4 million renovation project on the middle school will be completed by the first day of classes, Aug. 25.

The district has hired 17 new teachers.

High school students will no longer have block scheduling.

Instead, they will have a trimester format.

“Block scheduling made it possible for students to go long periods of time without taking a math course,” said Eric Dreibelbis, director of curriculum and instruction.

“They would perform well in classwork…,” he said. But they labored on the state assessment test, “because they’d been out of the classes for too long.”

Courses under the new format will run 60 days and some practical arts classes will divide into two sessions to adapt to the new schedule.

Look for enrichment courses, too, such as robotics, anatomy and physiology.

In the meantime, Dreibelbis said the district’s new strategic plan will target ways to improve attendance, graduation rates and SAT scores.

There are some changes in leadership.

Jenny LeSage, previously the Pequea Valley Middle School assistant principal, will take over as special education coordinator at the high school. Taylor Croft fills in LeSage’s old post.

Dreibelbis said Pequea Valley is still hiring teachers, but expects to bring in about 14 new faces.

More changes will come after winter break when the new Paradise Elementary School opens its doors.

The southern-end school district will see some new leaders.

Robert J. Dangler will become principal at Bart-Colerain Elementary School, replacing Thomas E. Brackbill, who retired. Paul E. Gladfelter takes over Dangler’s old post as assistant principal of Smith and Swift middle schools.

Shirley F. Hunter fills in Brackbill’s other position as director of elementary education.

Scott Van Vooren will take over as assistant principal at the high school. David Ludwig is the food service director.

The school district is conducting a feasibility study of facilities such as building capacity, classroom adequacy, energy efficiency and security.

The new K-12 curriculum in the area of school counseling goes into effect this year. It focuses on anti-bullying, social skills and respect, with attention to racial conflict.

Its goal: Encourage students to report bullying and intimidation and help teachers spot trouble sooner.

The district is continuing with its No Place for Hate programs with the Anti-Defamation League.

The high school also will continue its student exchange program with McCaskey High School in Lancaster.

A high school science classroom will have an interactive whiteboard, projector, computers for the classroom and teacher. The district will also buy digital cameras.

The district has hired 17 new teachers.

This is the first full year for the district’s rapid emergency response system. The program sends messages to parents and staff in the event of an emergency and for early release days.

Robert Lombardo has been named as acting superintendent, replacing John George, who resigned.

Jill M. Hackman has been named acting assistant superintendent in Lombardo’s place.

Melanie Calender has been named acting director of student services, replacing Hackman.

Susan Logan is an assistant principal at the high school. Last year, her title was assistant to the principal.

Scott Galen also has been named assistant principal at the high school, a new position.

Renovation and construction began in June on Warwick Middle School.

The construction will not impact students.

(Staff writers Liz Navratil, Dan Rorabaugh and Stephen Zook contributed to this report.)

(Copyright 2008 Lancaster Newspapers. All rights reserved.)

(c) 2008 Lancaster New Era. Provided by ProQuest LLC. All rights Reserved.




comments powered by Disqus