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Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 17:24 EDT

Education News Archive - July 27, 2008

By ZENA HAWLEY More strikes are set to take place at a Derby school after plans to turn it into an academy moved a step nearer.

By Emily Mullin Yough School District will have a new superintendent effective Aug. 11. Denise Shipe, former acting superintendent and assistant superintendent in Ambridge Area School District, Beaver County, was unanimously appointed to the post during a reconvened board meeting Thursday.

By Jeffrey Robb, Omaha World-Herald, Neb. Jul. 27--Educators are looking for ways to raise the achievement of disadvantaged students as politicians try to legislate improvements, philanthropists pump money into new programs and researchers analyze the approaches everyone has tried.

By Gina Smith, The State, Columbia, S.C. Jul. 27--Newest member says government must be involved in reforms Julie Hershey, Gov.

By McNulty, Ian NEWS BEAT As New Orleans' long-troubled public education system is being rebuilt and revitalized after Katrina, the national teacher recruiting group Teach for America is sending a bumper crop of young educators to the area to staff schools and invlgorate local classrooms.

By Bower, Bruce Proportion of boys in the class doesn't affect girls Here's some news preschool boys don't want to hear: Those who attend classes with a majority of girls receive an intellectual boost by the end of the school year.

By Anonymous A New Jersey high school student is speaking out against a civics textbook that inaccurately portrays the state of the law regarding prayer in public schools. Matthew LaClair, a high school senior in Kearny, N.J., has criticized the book American Government by John J.

By Murphy, Beth E Preceptors are critical participants in the education of student nurses. They establish role expectations and evaluate performance based on faculty input and student responses.

By Jennifer Smith Richards, The Columbus Dispatch, Ohio Jul. 27--Metro High School was built on a basic principle: Good enough isn't good enough. Now it has some proof that it's living up to that.

By Benjamin Niolet and Samiha Khanna, The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C. Jul. 27--A North Carolina program that allows high school students to take college courses online has earned national acclaim, and a battle over funding even threatened to extend the recent legislative session.