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Education News Archive - August 27, 2008

By George Will OAKLAND, Calif. - Seated at a solitary desk in the hall outside a classroom, the slender 13-year-old boy with a smile like a sunrise earnestly does remedial algebra, assisted by a paid tutor. She, too, is 13.

Some of the best-ever GCSE results, both locally and nationally, have been achieved in 2008. This year's statistics also reveal the biggest annual rise in A* and A passes with one in five results being given one or other of those grades.

By Karen Robinson This fall, East Aurora school officials will study potential changes in elementary school bus runs a year ahead of time to prepare for changes in district grade level configurations planned for Parkdale Elementary School's expansion, which should be completed by fall of 2009.

High Time: Well done to the students and staff at Trentham High for the excellent GCSE results this year. This is evidence of how well staff and students are working at the school.

Retiring head teacher Michael Crane has bowed out in style as his school recorded its best GCSE results. Pupils at John Port School, in Etwall, did him proud by posting a pass rate of 72.6% for five or more A* to C grades, 65% including English and maths.

By Davin White Although no Kanawha County students will start the school year in a brand new school - unlike some of their peers in Putnam County - there are quite a few changes in store for their first day back today. Students have new computers in the business labs at all eight high schools.

School children visited homes under construction to learn more about the building industry. The school council of King's Stanley Junior School recently visited Crest Nicholson's development at Eastington to find out more about how houses are built.

Boys marginally out-performed girls in the GCSE results at Littleover Community School. The school once again topped the league in the city, with 86% of pupils gaining five or more A* to C grades, 75% including English and maths.

By The Associated Press HARROLD, Texas (AP) -- Along with normal first-day jitters and excitement, students in this tiny district started school Monday wondering which teachers might be toting firearms.

By Veronica Nett The new Teays Valley elementary school will open its doors to students today, but those doors won't have a name over them. "We want to allow the students to have an input on that," said Putnam County Schools spokeswoman Karen Nowviskie.

Word of the Day
kenspeckle
  • Having so marked an appearance as easily to be recognized.
This word may come from the Swedish 'kanspak,' quick at recognizing persons or things, or else from confusion with 'conspicuous.'