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Last updated on April 23, 2014 at 16:13 EDT

Education News Archive - September 19, 2008

By Sarah Cassidy Half of school maths lessons are not good enough, with pupils drilled to pass tests but given little real understanding of the subject, a damning report by the education watchdog warns today.

By ZENA HAWLEY Pupils have given the thumbs-up to their new pounds20m school, which opened for lessons yesterday. Sinfin Community School has been rebuilt following a fire in March 2006, which destroyed large parts of the building.

TOO many schools are failing to provide children with a good maths education, inspectors warned today. An Ofsted review of maths in primary and secondary schools in England found many lessons do not teach children how to apply maths to other subjects and in their everyday lives.

By Nealy, Michelle J Pluviose, David; Roach, Ronald Introducing the "Champions of Diversity" in the Academic Kickoff issue proved a timely reminder of the mission of Diverse during the lead-up to the 25th anniversary of Cox, Matthews and Associates, the founder of the former Black Issues in Higher Education and publisher of Diverse.

By Anderson, Michelle D Through the Intellectual Entrepreneurship: Cross-Disciplinary Consortium at UT, students of diverse backgrounds are being introduced to graduate-level work.

By Anonymous COLUMBUS, Ohio - In an online survey of more than 600 students heading to elementary school through 12th grade this fall, Huntington Bank found that 56 percent of students underestimated the cost of buying classroom and extracurricular activity supplies.

By Dervarics, Charles Newly signed law includes more than 60 initiatives, including those for single parent students, active duty military and disabled students.

By Nealy, Michelle J While Dr. Kofi Lomotey has held appointments at predominately White institutions, he understands the critically important roles that historically Black colleges and universities play in educating Black students.

By Nancy Mitchell Denver Public Schools will start classes three hours late on five days this school year, a move aimed at giving teachers more time for training. But the late-start days upset some parents, who urged school board members Thursday to reconsider the plan.

By MEG HECKMAN Many New Hampshire students aren't meeting state standards in science, according to the first round of statewide testing in the subject in five years.