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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 1:20 EDT

New White Paper from Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance Assesses Visual Field Risks of Vigabatrin

December 6, 2013

SILVER SPRING, Md., Dec. 6, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — A new white paper from the Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance (TS Alliance), entitled “Vigabatrin-Associated Visual Field Loss (VAVFL): What You Need to Know,” was released today at the American Epilepsy Society annual meeting in Washington, DC. The white paper was written by Darcy A. Krueger, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Clinical Pediatrics and Neurology, Tuberous Sclerosis Clinic, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Vigabatrin is approved in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration to treat infantile spasms and medically refractory complex partial seizures that are common in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC).

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“Infantile spasms occur in approximately one-third of children with TSC,” says TS Alliance President and CEO Kari Luther Rosbeck. “Because vigabatrin is the first-line medication recommended in the recently released TSC Clinical Consensus Guidelines to treat these types of seizures, it was important to address the medication’s side effects, which Dr. Krueger has done in this new white paper.”

“The purpose of this white paper is to provide an authoritative report about vigabatrin-associated visual field loss (VAVFL) based on published clinical reports and studies,” Dr. Krueger explains. “This report was written for patients and their families and will help in making an informed decision about the use of vigabatrin to treat infantile spasms and/or complex partial epilepsy.” The white paper summarizes and critically evaluates what is known about the prevalence of VAVFL following vigabatrin exposure and possible ways to manage any potential retinal toxicity as reported in published, peer-reviewed publications.

TSC is a multi-system genetic disorder that causes tumors to form in vital organs, primarily the brain, heart, eyes, kidneys, lungs and skin. It’s also the leading genetic cause of both autism and epilepsy. Approximately 50,000 people in the United States suffer from the disease, and it has an estimated incidence of 1 in 6,000 live births. More than 1 million people worldwide have TSC.

Formed in 1974, the TS Alliance is the only U.S.-based non-profit organization dedicated to finding a cure for TSC while improving the lives of those affected. For more information, visit www.tsalliance.org or call 800-225-6872. The white paper, supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Lundbeck, is available for download at http://www.tsalliance.org/documents/Vigabatrin%20Associated%20Visual%20Field%20Loss%20White%20Paper.pdf. The new Clinical Consensus Guidelines are available at www.tsalliance.org/consensus.

For more information contact:
Jaye D. Isham, Vice President, Communications Strategy
(301) 562-9890, jisham@tsalliance.org

SOURCE Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance


Source: PR Newswire