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CTIA-The Wireless Association® and Common Sense Media Discussed Children and Teens Online Mobile Safety and Usage with Educators and Policymakers

October 6, 2010

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 6 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — At CTIA Enterprise & Applications(TM) today, CTIA-The Wireless Association® and Common Sense Media convened state and federal education and online safety experts, policymakers and industry representatives to discuss the latest in research and studies about children’s wireless use. Attendees also learned how education and technology policy issues can impact responsible wireless behavior by reinforcing the value of wireless devices and services. This afternoon’s three educational panels were a part of the national “Be Smart. Be Fair. Be Safe: Responsible Wireless Use” campaign (http://besmartwireless.com/), which was launched at International CTIA WIRELESS(TM) in March 2010. The initiative has been successful with thousands of website visitors and hundreds of media stories across the country.

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As wireless technology continues to seamlessly integrate and be integral in our everyday lives from education to healthcare, CTIA and its members are committed to helping parents and teachers ensure that kids are being smart and safe with wireless devices and services.

Speakers at the event included:

  • U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Educational Technology Deputy Director Steve Midgley, who discussed the recommendations of the National Broadband Plan (NBP) and National Educational Technology Plan (NETP) to ensure America’s students are prepared for the 21st Century global economy;
  • Federal Communications Commission’s Chief of Consumer & Governmental Affairs, Joel Gurin, who discussed the commission’s efforts to empower parents to protect children in online environments and the National Broadband Plan’s (NBP) recommendation to improve connectivity to schools and libraries by upgrading and modernizing the successful E-rate program; and
  • Pew Internet & American Life Project’s Senior Research Specialist, Amanda Lenhart, who discussed the results of a recent report on Teens and Mobile Phones which studied teen and family use of cell phones, smart phones and other mobile services.

“These panels were a great opportunity for policymakers and industry leaders to hear directly from local educators who are working to bring the benefits of mobile technology into their classrooms, and to ensure that students are using the technology in smart and safe ways,” said Alan Simpson, vice president of policy for Common Sense Media.

“Today’s event is a continuation of the wireless industry’s long-standing commitment to supporting parents and helping educate kids about responsible wireless behavior. By understanding how children are using wireless devices and being aware of the tools and tips the industry and our members currently offer, parents and policymakers can ensure children are using their devices in an appropriate manner,” said Steve Largent, president and CEO of CTIA-The Wireless Association.

CTIA-The Wireless Association® (www.ctia.org) is an international organization representing the wireless communications industry. Membership in the association includes wireless carriers and their suppliers, as well as providers and manufacturers of wireless data services and products. CTIA advocates on behalf of its members at all levels of government. The association also coordinates the industry’s voluntary best practices and initiatives, and sponsors the industry’s leading wireless tradeshows. CTIA was founded in 1984 and is based in Washington, DC.

Common Sense Media (www.commonsensemedia.org) is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology.

SOURCE CTIA-The Wireless Association


Source: newswire



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