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Oliver Stone shows clips from “World Trade Center”

May 21, 2006

By Bob Tourtellotte

CANNES, France (Reuters) – Director Oliver Stone has given
the Cannes film festival the first glimpse of “World Trade
Center,” a tale of survival on the day of the September 11,
2001 attacks.

Before the roughly 20 minutes of the movie were shown late
on Sunday, Stone told an audience it resembled his
Oscar-winning “Platoon” — also screened to mark its 20th
anniversary — in that it took the view of everyday people
involved in conflict and attempted to find truth within their
story.

Stone said that whether in Vietnam, the current conflict in
Iraq or “in the rubble of the World Trade Center,” his struggle
had been to re-tell what really happened.

“It’s the true story of two New York Port Authority
policemen who were trapped in the rubble, their wives and the
children and the incredible, almost improbable rescue efforts
that went on to rescue them,” Stone said.

“The truth must exist in some way to confront power and
extremism,” the 59-year-old added.

Based on the clip, which follows the policemen as they go
about their normal lives before joining the rescue effort after
the towers are hit, “World Trade Center” does not appear to
delve into conspiracies like his “JFK,” about the assassination
of John F. Kennedy.

The movie stars Nicolas Cage as the leader of the policemen
who are trapped inside the building and must be saved.

The footage ended as the buildings came down, and all the
audiences can see were Cage’s eyes in the dark.

The full movie is due to be released in the United States
in August, not long before the fifth anniversary of the
attacks.

It comes several months after Paul Greengrass’s “United
93,” a film that seeks to reconstruct events on the hijacked
plane which plowed into a field in Pennsylvania after three
others had hit the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

When the trailer for that film was shown, audience
complaints prompted one New York City cinema to pull the
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Source: reuters



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