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No charges for Kate Moss over cocaine allegation

June 15, 2006

By Tim Castle

LONDON (Reuters) – British supermodel Kate Moss will not
face charges over allegations she took illegal drugs at a
London recording studio last year, the Crown Prosecution
Service (CPS) said on Thursday.

The 32-year-old was questioned by police but not arrested
after the Daily Mirror tabloid published photographs from film
taken last September of her apparently snorting large
quantities of cocaine.

The CPS said it had concluded there was insufficient
evidence for a realistic prospect of convicting the model.

“The film footage provides an absolutely clear indication
that Ms Moss was using controlled drugs and providing them to
others,” said Rene Barclay, the CPS’s London director of
serious casework.

“However, in the absence of any forensic evidence, or
direct eye witness evidence about the substance in question,
its precise nature could not be established.”

Moss and the direct eyewitnesses had declined to provide
any explanation when interviewed, Barclay added.

Moss flew abroad after the photos appeared and spent time
in the United States, where she attended a drug rehabilitation
clinic, and in France, before returning to Britain.

The scandal prompted British fashion house Burberry and
Swedish-based Hennes and Mauritz to cut ties with Moss, one of
the most famous faces in fashion. France’s Chanel also said it
would not renew a contract with her when it expired.

Her career recovered swiftly, with a new contract for
camera maker Nikon and front page appearances for French
fashion bible Vogue and U.S. celebrity magazine Vanity Fair.

She has never confessed to taking illegal drugs, although
she issued a statement last year apologizing to friends and
family for behavior which “reflected badly” on them.

Moss is a favorite subject for British newspapers, which
have closely followed her on-off relationship with troubled
British rocker Pete Doherty. Doherty pleaded guilty earlier
this year to possessing heroin and cocaine.


Source: reuters



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