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Rock stars lend tunes to covers album

September 3, 2006

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Tori Amos’ radical reworking of
“Smells Like Teen Spirit” and the camp rendering of “Dancing in
the Street” by David Bowie and Mick Jagger are among the tracks
collected for a covers compilation CD that will benefit a
medical charity.

Also included on “Between the Covers,” which Sony BMG will
release in the United States on September 12 to benefit the
T.J. Martell Foundation, are Lenny Kravitz’s take on “American
Woman,” Madonna’s reheated “American Pie” and the Dixie Chicks’
update of “Landslide.”

The country trio’s version of the Stevie Nicks tune was
described as “county fair Muzak” in the recent book “I Hate
Myself and Want to Die: The 52 Most Depressing Songs You’ve
Ever Heard” by Tom Reynolds.

The Bowie/Jagger duet on the Motown classic “Dancing in the
Street” was recorded in 1985 to benefit Live Aid. A spokeswoman
for “Between the Covers” said it would be the responsibility of
EMI, which released their version, to disburse its royalty from
the new album to Live Aid.

“We hope that both T.J. Martell and Live Aid can benefit
from sales of the CD,” the spokeswoman said.

In general, the artists, record companies, songwriters and
music publishers licensed the recordings and compositions on
“Between The Covers” at significantly below-market rates, she
added.

Amos’ piano-driven version of Nirvana’s anthemic “Smells
Like Teen Spirit” was originally released on her 1992 EP
“Crucify,” drawing snickers from the grunge crowd in the
process.

The only previously unreleased track on “Between the
Covers” is the Bacon Brothers’ version of the Beatles’ “If I
Needed Someone.”

The other tunes are: “Everlasting Love,” by U2; “Downtown
Train,” by Rod Stewart; “Ol’ 55,” by Sarah McLachlan; “Nobody
Knows You When You’re Down And Out,” by Eric Clapton; “Cold
Cold Heart,” by Norah Jones; “This Woman’s Work,” by Maxwell;
“The First Cut Is The Deepest,” by Sheryl Crow; and “If I Was
Your Woman”/”Walk On By,” by Alicia Keys.

The T.J. Martell Foundation, which has strong ties to the
music industry, supports cancer, leukemia, and AIDS research.

Reuters/VNU


Source: reuters



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