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Mesothelioma Researchers Call for Ban on Chrysotile Asbestos According to SurvivingMesothelioma.com

September 15, 2011

SurvivingMesothelioma.com reports that the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin has concluded that chrysotile asbestos has caused mesothelioma and a ban of asbestos is needed to stop mesothelioma.

(PRWEB) September 15, 2011

SurvivingMesothelioma.com reports that the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin has concluded that chrysotile asbestos has caused mesothelioma and a ban of asbestos is needed to stop mesothelioma.

Chrysotile is the main type of serpentine asbestos and by far the most frequently used type of asbestos in industry. About 95 percent of the asbestos mined and used around the world is of the chrysotile variety. But as the researchers note, âœThere has been continuing controversy over the capability of chrysotile asbestos to cause pleural and peritoneal mesotheliomaâ. Their study aims to settle the debate once and for all.

Both serpentine and amphibole types of asbestos have been used around the world for decades as inexpensive insulators and building materials. But because of what many consider to be incontrovertible evidence of their association with mesothelioma, a number of countries have now banned their use. Others, including the U.S., attempt to protect workers from asbestos-related diseases such as mesothelioma by regulating how asbestos can be handled.

Not surprisingly, some of largest exporters of chrysotile asbestos, such as Canada and Russia, have been among the most vocal at denying its toxicity and defending its use. But the University of Wisconsin study appears to contradict their arguments.

The Wisconsin researchers conducted an exhaustive a worldwide review of the scientific literature on asbestos and mesothelioma. They looked at thousands of case studies as well as epidemiological studies searching for âœwell documented chrysotile asbestos associated mesothelioma casesâ. What they found were thousands of cases of mesothelioma directly connected to chrysotile exposure in mining, manufacturing, and communities.

Summarizing their findings in the Annals of Epidemiology, Marty S. Kanarek, PhD, MPH, Professor of Population Health Sciences and Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin writes, âœChrysotile asbestos, along with all other types of asbestos, has caused mesothelioma and a world-wide ban of all asbestos is warranted to stop an epidemic of mesothelioma.â

Although the number of mesothelioma cases in the U.S. has begun to slowly decline since the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) began regulating asbestos use, cases are still on the rise in many other countries. The World Health Organization estimates more than 100,000 cases of mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases occur globally each year.

For more information about mesothelioma doctors and treatment options visit the Surviving Mesothelioma website. http://www.survivingmesothelioma.com

Sources: Kanarek, Marty, âœMesothelioma from Chrysotile Asbestos: Updateâ, Annals of Epidemiology, September 2011, Volume 2, Issue 9, pp 688-697.

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prwebmesothelioma/asbestos/prweb8797970.htm


Source: prweb