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Results in a New Study Published in the Annals of Medicine Show Startling Discrepancy in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Policy and Evidence-Based Medicine

January 18, 2012

The publication of the startling results of a Canadian study involving the effectiveness of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine against cervical cancer demonstrate that vaccine policy and evidence-based medicine are at odds. Lucija Tomljenovic, PhD and Christopher A. Shaw, PhD of the University of British Columbia´s evidence-based study was recently published in the Annals of Medicine, a highly-ranked peer reviewed medical journal. (http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/07853890.2011.645353)

New York, NY (PRWEB) January 18, 2012

The publication of the startling results of a Canadian study involving the effectiveness of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine against cervical cancer demonstrate that vaccine policy and evidence-based medicine are at odds. Lucija Tomljenovic, PhD and Christopher A. Shaw, PhD of the University of British Columbia´s evidence-based study was recently published in the Annals of Medicine, a highly-ranked peer reviewed medical journal. (http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/07853890.2011.645353)

The significant results are receiving worldwide attention.

The key messages published show a major discrepancy in vaccine industry claims regarding the safety and efficacy of Gardasil and Cervarix, the two HPV vaccines currently given to girls and boys as young as 12 years old, to prevent forms of cancers associated with HPV. Promoted heavily in the U.S. by their respective manufacturers, Merck (Gardasil) and GlaxoSmithKline (Cervarix), the HPV vaccines are also backed by U.S. government directed health departments including the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In California, a new law stipulates that children as young as 12 can accept the HPV vaccine without parental consent.

The study reveals:

  •     To date, the efficacy of HPV vaccines in preventing cervical cancer has not been demonstrated, while vaccine risks still need to be fully evaluated.
  •     Current worldwide HPV immunization practices with either of the two HPV vaccines appear to be neither justified by long-term health benefits nor economically viable, nor is there any evidence that HPV vaccination (even if proven effective against cervical cancer) would reduce the rate of cervical cancer beyond what pap screening has already achieved.
  •     Cumulatively, the list of serious adverse reactions related to HPV vaccination worldwide includes deaths, convulsions, paraesthesia, paralysis, Guillain—Barré syndrome (GBS), transverse myelitis, facial palsy, chronic fatigue syndrome, anaphylaxis, autoimmune disorders, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolisms, and cervical cancers.
  •     Because the HPV vaccination program has global coverage, the long-term health of many women may be at risk against still unknown vaccine benefits.
  •     Physicians should adopt a more rigorous evidence-based medicine approach in order to provide a balanced and objective evaluation of vaccine risks and benefits to their patients.

HPV Statistics:

There are approximately 9,800 new cases of cervical cancer annually diagnosed in the U.S., which represents only .71% of the approximate 1.3 million new cancers cases of ally types diagnosed. In the U.S. cervical cancer is the 14th most common type of cancer in women, but in South America, Africa and Asia, cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women because of poor health care and no pap screening. Annually there are nearly 3,700 deaths annually attributed to HPV-related cervical cancer, which is approximate .65% of the approximately 570,000 cancer deaths that occur in the U.S. Most cervical pre-cancers develop slowly, so nearly all cervical cancers can be prevented with regular pap smear screening and prompt treatment. Survival for women with HPV-invasive cervical cancer lesions is nearly 100% with early diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/1/prweb9112116.htm


Source: prweb



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