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DRIVE SMART Colorado Announces Winners of High School Traffic Safety Challenge

February 20, 2012

21,000 Colorado Springs students and teachers compete in seven-week driving safety challenge.

Colorado Springs, Colorado (PRWEB) February 20, 2012

Nearly 21,000 high school students and staff members participated in DRIVE SMART Colorado´s seven-week challenge to promote safe driving habits. The campaign ran from late October to early December, and after receiving entries from 21 area schools, the DRIVE SMART Colorado officials have announced the winners of the challenge.

“We know the DRIVE SMART challenge has had a major impact on our teens,” said Maile Gray, Executive Director of DRIVE SMART COLORADO. “Besides having one of the top buckle-up rates for Colorado teens, these kids look forward to this campaign each year. It thrills me to know these students are so involved and taking this program so seriously all while having fun.”

Most Improved Buckle-Up Rate

1st Place: Fountain-Fort Carson High School and Tesla Learning Center

2nd Place: Palmer High School and Bijou School

Best Distracted Driving Theme

1st Place: Coronado High School and Peyton High School

2nd Place: Harrison High School and James Irwin Charter School

Best Overall Campaign

1st Place: Woodland Park High School and Manitou Springs High School

2nd Place: Mesa Ridge High School and Edison School

Other Prizes

Best Notebook: Woodland Park High School

Best DRIVE SMART short video: Mesa Ridge High School

McDivitt Law Firm Video Contest: Manitou Springs High School

First place teams received “DRIVE SMART CHALLENGE 2011 CHAMPION” banners to hang in their schools. A total of $1,950 in prizes also were awarded to the winning teams. All of the participating teams received custom banners reminding everyone to drive safely.

What Is the High School Traffic Safety Challenge?

Founded in 1990, the DRIVE SMART High School Traffic Safety Challenge invites students in Teller and El Paso counties to create safety campaigns addressing driving concerns, such as seat belt use, traffic laws, and dangers of driving while distracted or under the influence.

From producing public service announcements for radio and television and writing plays to presenting car crash rescue simulations and inviting speakers to their schools, student teams choose how they want to convey their messages.

Dedicated representatives from local businesses, government, hospitals, law enforcement, and military come together to help these teens create messages. One such business, McDivitt Law Firm, has sponsored the video public service announcement (PSA) portion of the challenge since 2009. This year, the law firm awarded $500 to the group that produced the winning video and covered the cost to televise the PSA on several networks.

Get Involved with DRIVE SMART

Many programs need operating funds and volunteers to assist with the various events, and sponsors and volunteers are always welcome. To get involved, call Maile Gray, Executive Director of DRIVE SMART Colorado, at (719) 444-7534, or attend a DRIVE SMART Steering Committee meeting on the second Tuesday of each month. Meetings are held at 10 a.m. at the Gold Hill Police Department substation located at 955 W. Moreno Avenue in Colorado Springs.

About DRIVE SMART Colorado

DRIVE SMART Colorado is a nationally recognized, award-winning community traffic safety program aimed at reducing the number of traffic crashes through community collaboration and education. The program began in 1989 as a corporate education campaign and has grown into a stand-alone, grassroots nonprofit organization. Today, DRIVE SMART´s steering committee comprises community members, including those from law enforcement, hospitals, public health, emergency medical services, businesses, schools, Mothers Against Drunk Driving, and Colorado Springs SAFE KIDS, to name a few. To learn more, visit http://www.DriveSmartColoradoSprings.com.

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prwebdrive-smart-colorado/teen-driving-safety/prweb9208380.htm


Source: prweb



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