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Rock, Limestone and Clay Mining in Australia Industry Market Research Report now updated by IBISWorld

April 15, 2012

After a rocky couple of years, the Rock, Limestone and Clay Mining industry is expected to grow strongly in 2011-12. The industry´s performance is influenced by the level of construction activity in Australia. The large rise in industry revenue will reflect the expected pick up in construction activity and growing demand for rock of various types. Non-dwelling construction is expanding particularly strongly, supporting demand. For these reasons, industry research firm IBISWorld has updated its report on the Rock, Limestone and Clay Mining industry.

Melbourne, Australia (PRWEB) April 15, 2012

After a rocky couple of years due to the global financial crisis, the Rock, Limestone and Clay Mining industry is expected to grow strongly in 2011-12. Industry revenue is expected to expand by 8.7% in 2011-12 to reach $2.46 billion. According to IBISWorld industry analyst Kate Convey, ℠the large rise in industry revenue expected for 2011-12 reflects the expected pick up in construction activity and growing demand for rock of various types.´ Non-dwelling construction is expanding particularly strongly. Despite this large gain, average annual growth for the five years through 2011-12 is expected to be a moderate 1.5% due to sharp declines in 2009-10 and 2008-09. Output is expected to increase and the bulk of output will be used by the local construction sector, either directly or as an input into other products such as cement and bricks. Both exports and imports are small, so the domestic market for the industry’s products closely matches revenue.

The Rock, Limestone and Clay Mining industry has a high level of concentration. The three major industry participants are Boral, Holcim and Hanson. The high concentration level in part reflects that a number of firms in the industry are subsidiaries of the largest participants. According to Convey, ℠in addition to supplying private and government construction projects, these companies generally also consume a substantial part of their quarry output in products such as cement, asphalt and bricks.´ The industry also has a large number of independent operators that usually, but not always, concentrate on particular regional areas.

Market conditions over recent years have been turbulent and the Rock, Limestone and Clay Mining industry is expected to remain captive to the booms and busts of the building cycle. The industry is expected to report strong growth during the next five years to 2016-17, reflecting a return to robust construction activity in the non-dwelling and housing construction sectors.

For more information, visit IBISWorld´s Rock, Limestone and Clay Mining report in Australia industry page.

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IBISWorld industry Report Key Topics

Firms in this industry quarry a range of construction materials, including rock, dimension stone (such as marble, granite and slate), clay, limestone and dolomite. Firms may also crush or screen broken rock.

Industry Performance

Executive Summary

Key External Drivers

Current Performance

Industry Outlook

Industry Life Cycle

Products & Markets

Supply Chain

Products & Services

Major Markets

Globalisation & Trade

Business Locations

Competitive Landscape

Market Share Concentration

Key Success Factors

Cost Structure Benchmarks

Barriers to Entry

Major Companies

Operating Conditions

Capital Intensity

Key Statistics

Industry Data

Annual Change

Key Ratios

About IBISWorld Inc.

Recognised as the nation´s most trusted independent source of industry and market research, IBISWorld offers a comprehensive database of unique information and analysis on every Australian industry. With an extensive online portfolio, valued for its depth and scope, the company equips clients with the insight necessary to make better business decisions. Headquartered in Melbourne, IBISWorld serves a range of business, professional service and government organisations through more than 10 locations worldwide. For more information, visit http://www.ibisworld.com.au or call (03) 9655 3886.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/4/prweb9399720.htm


Source: prweb



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