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Explore Tibet Team Introduces the Tashilhunpo Thangka Display to Travelers

April 15, 2012

Explore Tibet Team, a professional Tibet travel agency based in Lhasa, introduces the Tashilhunpo Thangka Display to travelers and says: ”The three-day Thangka exhibition at the Tashilhunpo monastery is a symbol of the city of Shigatse and an important display of Tibetan Buddhist art and culture.”

(PRWEB) April 15, 2012

Explore Tibet Team, a professional Tibet travel agency based in Lhasa, introduces the Tashilhunpo Thangka Display to travelers and says: ”The three-day Thangka exhibition at the Tashilhunpo monastery is a symbol of the city of Shigatse and an important display of Tibetan Buddhist art and culture. Everyone is supposed to know something about it before their Tibet trips

Shigatse is the second largest city in Tibet and is located about 260 kilometers southwest of Lhasa at the confluence of the Brahmaputra and Nyang Rivers. The city is at an elevation of 3,840 meters, with most rainfall in the summer months, and sunshine all year round.

The heart of Shigatse is the Tashilhunpo Monastery, established in 1447 by the first Dalai Lama. The monastery is the traditional home of the Panchen Lama, considered to be the most important spiritual leader in Tibet after the Dalai Lama himself.

Thangka paintings are a Tibetan style of art, brought from Nepal in the 7th century by the wife of Songtsan Gampo, the first king of unified Tibet. Thangka paintings are depictions of deities, lamas, or other Buddhist symbols like the Wheel of Life, painted onto a cotton or silk scroll. They are usually small, suitable for homes and shrines, though temples and monasteries have much larger ones for display at festivals, such as the ones featured at the Tashilhunpo exhibition.

Thangka paintings are rich with Buddhist symbolism, and can be used as teaching and meditation tools. Practitioners of the art form practice for many years to perfect their technique, and this type of painting is a pure expression of Tibetan art and culture.

The Tashilhunpo Thangka display occurs every year during the second week of the fifth month of the Tibetan lunar calendar. This year the activities and displays will begin on July 3rd and last for three days. Over the course of these days three different thangka paintings will be displayed on a special wall outside the monastery for two hours, and pilgrims from all over the region will attend the ceremony. The three paintings represent the past, present, and future, and attendance at the ceremony brings blessings to the visitor to visit Tibet for the coming year.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/4/prweb9403748.htm


Source: prweb