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Dr. Avi Ishaaya Simplifies The Relationship Between Obesity and Sleep Apnea

September 21, 2012

Sometimes, the best path to shed off the pounds is to simply sleep better. Aviisha will shed $100 off the price of its Home Sleep Test to help patients shed off their excess pounds and get a better night sleep. (promo code:ExtraLb)*

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) September 21, 2012

Sleep apnea and obesity feed on each other creating a deadly downward spiral of disease.

Repeated arousals during sleep, which characterize sleep apnea, may result in insulin resistance and poor regulation of blood sugars. In addition, hormonal changes may increase the storage of fat and the increased appetite for high calorie foods, leading to further weight gain. Thus poor sleep as experienced by sleep apnea sufferers can contribute to weight gain or to the inability to lose weight. On the other hand, obese or over-weight people are at higher risk for obstructive sleep apnea as fat deposits narrow the airway making it more susceptible to obstruction.

What are Leptin and Ghrelin and why are they important?

So what is the biology linking poor sleep and weight gain? Introducing Leptin and Ghrelin. Leptin is the hormone involved in the regulation of appetite, metabolism and calorie burning. Leptin´s job is to inform the brain when the body had enough food and should start burning up calories. While sleeping, the levels of Leptin in the body increase. When the level of Leptin is high, the brain thinks that the body has sufficient energy and thus it does not require or seek food. However, when one does not get enough sleep, the level of Leptin decreases. When the level of Leptin is low, the brain thinks that the body does not have enough energy creating the feeling of hunger, even though what is needed is sleep and not food. Furthermore, the brain instructs the body to store the calories consumed as fat preparing itself for the next time it may need energy.

Ghrelin is the other hormone involved in regulation of weight. As opposed to Leptin, Ghrelin´s job is to inform the brain when the body needs to eat and store energy as fat instead of burn calories. When sleeping, the body requires less energy, and, therefore, the level of Ghrelin decreases. However, when one does not get enough sleep, the level of Ghrelin increases causing the brain to think that the body should eat, when, in fact, all it needs is sleep. The brain also notifies the body to stop burning calories and instead store them since it thinks there is an energy shortage. Thus lack of sleep makes the body crave food it does not really need.

To order the home sleep test, call 877-4AVIISHA (877-428-4474) or visit sleep.aviisha.com and use the promotional code ExtraLb.*

About the Aviisha Medical Institute, LLC

Aviisha Medical Institute is a healthcare provider specializing in the home diagnosis and treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). Aviisha´s goal is to improve the quality of life of people affected by sleep apnea through state-of-the-art home diagnostic and sleep therapy services. At Aviisha, patients are provided with the highest quality, comprehensive care in the comfort and privacy of their own homes at the most affordable prices.

Aviisha’s award-winning home test is a convenient, fast and easy solution to finding out if someone has sleep apnea. Most insurance carriers, including Medicare, consider the home test to be as reliable and accurate as in-lab testing. Aviisha’s home test includes free FedEx shipping both ways and the interpretation of the test results by a board-certified sleep physician. Due to certain medical conditions, in-lab testing may be required, which can be done at Aviisha’s fully accredited sleep lab in Southern California.

For more information visit http://sleep.aviisha.com or call 877-4AVIISHA (877-428-4474).

  •      Offer expires 10/20/2012. Original price $350 cannot be combined with any other offers.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/9/prweb9923500.htm


Source: prweb



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