Quantcast
Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 21:20 EDT

Bel Marra Health Reports on a New Study: Reproductive Male Health on the Swift Decline Due to Television Viewing

February 14, 2013

Bel Marra Health, who offers high-quality, specially formulated vitamins and nutritional supplements, is reporting on a new study that outlines how reproductive male health is on the sharp decline due to television viewing.

Toronto, ON (PRWEB) February 14, 2013

Bel Marra Health, who offers high-quality, specially formulated vitamins and nutritional supplements, is reporting on a new study that outlines how reproductive male health is on the sharp decline due to television viewing.

As Bel Marra Health reports in its article (http://www.belmarrahealth.com/general-health-2/scary-effects-of-tv-on-male-sexual-health/) just last year the journal of Human Reproduction reported that reproductive male health around the world is in sharp decline. The statement was made following a study in France that found sperm count in men fell by a third over a 20 year period. Today Harvard researchers believe one of the biggest contributing factors is watching TV.

According to the Mayo Clinic a sperm count is officially low when a man has fewer than 15 million sperm per milliliter of semen. For some time now medical researchers have been trying to determine the causes of low sperm count. Aside from medical problems such as infection or tumors, theories have included exposure to environmental toxins, exposure to radiation, prolonged emotional stress, smoking, drug and alcohol abuse, as well as obesity. This latest study points to sedentary behavior.

As the Bel Marra Health article reports, during the research close to 200 men; the majority college students were asked a number of questions related to their lifestyle, such as eating habits, physical activity, and stress levels. Each participant also provided a semen sample for analysis. It turns out the couch potatoes didn´t fare so well. Men who exercised more than 15 hours per week had 73 per cent higher sperm counts than men who took part in less than 5 hours of physical activity per week. Men who watched more than 20 hours of TV had a 44 per cent lower sperm count than those who watched little or no TV at all. The researchers eliminated 2 risk factors; smoking and obesity, as contributing factors among the participants.

Now that the Harvard study has linked sedentary behavior to sperm count, medical experts are asking questions. Some scientists speculate that exercise produces more antioxidant enzymes that prevent oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is what normally damages cell membranes in the body. It is believed that this damage can also impact the creation of new sperm cells.

Other theories on male health and reduced sperm count due to sedentary behavior are more controversial. For example, some believe that men who watch too much TV just might be squishing their scrotums in the way they are sitting, making that area of the body too hot to produce new sperm.

Some studies suggest that sperm production slows if the scrotum temperature rises 1.8 to 3.6 F. In order to determine true fertility, more than one sample of semen is required along with detailed blood work. Most doctors do agree that it is important for fertility, as well as good health overall for people to get up and get moving.

(SOURCE: “Br J Sports Med..” Physical activity and television watching in relation to semen quality in young men. Feb 4, 2013)

Bel Marra Health is the maker of “Heart Rescue” a high-quality nutritional supplement designed for liver health in formulations designed to address this specific health concern. All ingredients are backed with scientific evidence. Every product is tested for safety, quality, and purity at every stage of the manufacturing process. Furthermore, Bel Marra Health products are produced only in Health Canada approved facilities, going that extra mile to ensure our health conscious customers are getting top quality products. For more information on Bel Marra Health visit http://www.belmarrahealth.com or call 1-866-531-0466.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2013/2/prweb10429368.htm


Source: prweb