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Doctors Health Press Reports on Study: Six Risk Factors Found to Be Linked to Cognitive Impairment

February 22, 2013

Doctors Health Press, a division of Lombardi Publishing Corporation and publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a new study out of Australia finding the top six risk factors that could lead to cognitive impairment.

Boston, MA (PRWEB) February 22, 2013

Doctors Health Press, a division of Lombardi Publishing Corporation and publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a new study out of Australia finding the top six risk factors that could lead to cognitive impairment.

As Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/brain-function-articles/memory-articles/six-top-risk-factors-for-memory-loss) notes, researchers at the Brain and Ageing Research Program at the University of New South Wales in Australia have tracked down the top risk factors that could lead to mild cognitive impairment. These risk factors point to some unusual places and their link to thinking and memory problems may be a surprise to many.

As the article “Six Top Risk Factors for Memory Loss” reports, in their effort to discover these six risk factors, the researchers evaluated 750 people, aged 70 to 90, without dementia. They performed several tests on the participants to diagnose the presence of mild cognitive impairment.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article states that researchers found the risk factors for mild cognitive impairment were linked to the following:

  • The presence of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele (an apolipoprotein that forms LDL cholesterol or “bad” cholesterol)
  • The presence of heart disease
  • High levels of homocysteine (raised levels of this amino acid are associated with atherosclerosis)
  • Poor sense of smell
  • Poor vision
  • Lower mental activity

The article adds that the researchers also found that the odds of having mild cognitive impairment were lower when the people in the study participated in greater levels of social activity. On the flip side, the risk for certain forms of cognitive impairment was greater in those taking antihypertensives and/or antidepressants (particularly in men).

(SOURCE: Sachdev, P.S., et al., “Risk profiles of subtypes of mild cognitive impairment: the sydney memory and ageing study,” J. Am. Geriatr. Soc. January 2013; 60(1): 24—33.)

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs, and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

Doctors Health Press believes in the healing properties of various alternative remedies, including Traditional Chinese Medicine. To see a video outlining the Doctors Health Press´ views on Traditional Chinese Medicine, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/chinesemedicine.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2013/2/prweb10458745.htm


Source: prweb