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Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 13:26 EDT

Tulikivi Announces a Current Trend of Using Refurbished Building Materials and Eco-Friendly Fireplaces in Renovations in Homes in North America

June 12, 2013

Cliff and Joan Montagne demolished their Bozeman, Montana home to eradicate mold and designed a sustainable home that marries the present and the past.

Bozeman, MT (PRWEB) June 12, 2013

It was an epic undertaking when Cliff and Joan Montagne made the decision to tear down the entire structure of their 1950-built home–well, with the exception of a massive two-story stone fireplace. The home was demolished due to mold and other environmental hazards. It was the addition of a Finnish soapstone fireplace, called a Tulikivi that brought the heart of this new home into eco-friendly harmony.

Cliff is a geologist and professor emeritus at Montana State University, so a design that united an appreciation for wood, stone and the comforts of fire were central to the design of their home. As their homebuilding plans unfolded, the Montagnes started to research sustainable ways of living. During this phase, Thor Arnold, their architect, introduced them to a radiant way to heat their home.

This recommendation led the Montagnes to meet with Ron Pihl, at Warmstone Fireplaces & Designs in Livingston, Montana. He took them on excursions to different homes in the Gallatin Valley in Montana, where multiple Tulikivi fireplaces are installed in homes there. There they discovered the unique design presence of soapstone and the clean radiant heat of the Tulikivi fireplace. “You´d see a group of people gathered around this soapstone fireplace, leaning against it. The Tulikivi generated much more than warmth. It was comforting. It was the heart of the room.” It reminded the couple of the masonry heaters they experienced when visiting in Norway and working in Russian Siberia many years ago.

Inspired by their discovery, the center of the home is where the design of the rebuilt Montagne´s home began. They wanted to keep their historic two-story fireplace, which was the only original feature of the previous home that was still intact. However, they also wanted their new home to have the clean, efficient radiant warmth that they experienced with the Tulikivi. “Arnold said, ℠I like to design a home around a Tulikivi,´” recounts Montagne. So Arnold designed this home to have the hearth as the heart of the home. Pihl had the Tulikivi TLU 2490/91 with heated bench installed to meet specs of the design and needs of the Montagnes. Now both fireplaces, the Tulikivi and the original stone fireplace, peacefully exist in one home.

The Tulikivi was incorporated for the simple beauty of soapstone and the eco-friendly radiant heat that fills their sustainability goal. The large stone fireplace is for sentimental reasons representing a house of the past. Cliff and Joan both grew up where fireplaces were the hub of their respective family homes. “Fireplaces were important in our lives growing up,” says Joan Montagne. “It was important in this home which we plan to live in for the rest of our lives.”

Because sustainability was also key factor to the couple when they rebuilt their Bozeman home, they also added solar panels and Durisol blocks. A tax credit from Northwestern Energy also gave them the advantage to add a solar hot water heater. In addition, they were able to recycle 60% of the wood from the demolished old house. They use recycled wood that couldn´t be used for building as a burning material for the Tulikivi. Now, the timber ravaged by the Rocky Mountain pine beetle also provides a plentiful source of natural firewood. The Tulikivi has become a daily part of their lives. Joan summarizes their morning routine by saying, “We get up, brush our teeth, feed the dog, and build a fire in the Tulikivi.” It is the ease of use, practical bake oven for cooking family favorites and the long lasting comfort throughout the day that brings them joy.

When you step inside the completed new Montagne home, the impact of both fireplaces is a striking contrast. The simple elegance of the Finnish soapstone also continues into other areas of the home, tying the various rooms together like an ancient stone path. The Montagnes loved the smooth texture of soapstone used for the Tulikivi so much, they chose it for two non-slip shower floors and windowsills in the house. It is an essential décor element in the spacious kitchen and the lush plant room.

This total eco-friendly renovation speaks to the heart of the Montagnes. As world travelers, today Cliff and Joan head BioRegions International (http://www.bioregions.org). This non-profit organization works to empower the nomadic cultures of Mongolia to survive in a rapidly-changing world. Cliff notes that Mongolia reminded them of the original landscape and culture of Montana, and they have worked in northern Mongolia for the past 15 years on behalf of BioRegions. Their renovation efforts speak a world of their passion for the environment. It was only logical that the award-winning green engineering aspects of the Tulikivi and the clean, efficient radiant heat paired nicely with the Montagnes´ eco-friendly philosophy.

For more information on Warmstone Fireplaces & Designs visit http://www.warmstone.com

The Tulikivi Group comprises the Tulikivi Corporation, which is a listed family enterprise, and its subsidiaries. The Tulikivi Group is the world´s largest manufacturer of heat-retaining fireplaces. Tulikivi has three product groups: Fireplaces, Saunas and Interior & Design. Tulikivi and its customers value wellbeing, interior design and the benefits of bioenergy. Tulikivi´s net sales are roughly EUR 60 million, of which exports account for about half. Tulikivi employs over 400 people. For more information about Tulikivi, please

visit http://www.tulikivi.com or follow them on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/Tulikivi. For the nearest distributor, call 800-843-3473.

Look for Tulikivi on Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter.

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prwebEcoFriendlyFireplaces/Tulilivi06_2013/prweb10822549.htm


Source: prweb