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UMass Boston Researcher Examines Impact of Climate Change on Marine Life

July 9, 2013

A University of Massachusetts Boston researcher has published a study that examines how rising ocean temperatures could upend the delicate balance of life in marine ecosystems.

Boston, MA (PRWEB) July 09, 2013

A University of Massachusetts Boston researcher has published a study that examines how rising ocean temperatures could upend the delicate balance of life in marine ecosystems.

Cascade Sorte, a researcher at UMass Boston’s School for the Environment, and Assistant Professor J. Wilson White of the University of North Carolina Wilmington, wrote the paper, which appeared in this week’s issue of Proceedings of the Royal Society, an influential academic journal published by the Royal Society of London.

Sorte and White ran experiments designed to predict how five common species of marine life would react to an increase in ocean temperature of up to 4.5 degrees Celsius, a jump predicted to occur by the year 2100.

These species grow along hard surfaces like docks, piers, boat hulls, and rocky reefs. The ways they respond to a warming ocean are important for biological and economic reasons. Biological changes include possible shifts in the dominant species in a particular environment.

An example of an economic effect is the potential proliferation of Watersipora, an organism common on the West Coast. Watersipora grows in massive colonies that increase drag on commercial vessels, slowing down their speed and thus increasing the cost of ocean shipping.

Importantly, Sorte and White found that the best predictions for the future hinged on including multiple experiments across multiple species, especially the interactions between competing species. The study can be found at the Royal Society’s website.

About UMass Boston

With a growing reputation for innovative research addressing complex issues, the University of Massachusetts Boston, metropolitan Boston’s only public university, offers its diverse student population both an intimate learning environment and the rich experience of a great American city. UMass Boston’s 10 colleges and graduate schools serve nearly 16,000 students while engaging local, national, and international constituents through academic programs, research centers, and public service activities. To learn more about UMass Boston, visit http://www.umb.edu.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/7/prweb10906274.htm


Source: prweb



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