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CampingSurvival.com Posts Video Interview of Potassium Iodate (KIO3) Expert Chuck Fenwick

July 12, 2013

CampingSurvival.com has announced the release of its recent video interview with iodine expert Chuck Fenwick of Medical Corps, a company that specializes in potassium iodine (KI) and potassium iodate (KIO3) supplements.

Fulton, NY (PRWEB) July 12, 2013

CampingSurvival.com has announced the release of its recent video interview with iodine expert Chuck Fenwick of Medical Corps, a company that specializes in potassium iodine (KI) and potassium iodate (KIO3) supplements.

In the event of a nuclear disaster, such as the intentional detonation of a dirty bomb or the accidental release of radioactivity from a nuclear power plant, people living downwind can be subjected to toxic fallout, including radioactive iodine 131. Both KIO3 and KI are thyroid blockers and are used world-wide to help prevent radioactive damage to the thyroid in the event of a nuclear incident. Radioactive iodine (I-131) can destroy the thyroid of humans and animals, even in small amounts. By taking KIO3, the thyroid becomes saturated with "good iodine" and cannot absorb radioactive I-131.

"If radioactivity is released into the atmosphere, it is vital for people in affected areas to take potassium iodate (KIO3) or potassium iodide (KI)," said Tom Sciacca, President of CampingSurvival.com. "Both potassium iodide and potassium iodate, if taken in time, block the thyroid gland's uptake of radioactive iodine, so it helps prevent thyroid cancer caused by exposure to airborne radioactive iodine dispersed in a nuclear event."

And because radioactivity is so dangerous to human health, the geographic region considered "downwind" can reach as far as 1,000 miles or more.

If you do not have KIO3 or KI at the time of the event, Fenwick said, then it is most likely too late to take a thyroid blocker unless the authorities can reach you with the proper dose during fallout conditions. Fenwick further stated that, when such a situation occurs – such as Japan's Fukashima nuclear reactor accident following the tsunami – supplies of KI and KIO3 are rapidly cleared off shelves. This leaves anyone who doesn't have their own supply at risk, should fallout travel to their region.

Fenwick said that even family pets can safely be administered KIO3 to prevent thyroid damage. He describes the advantages of KIO3 (potassium iodate) over KI (potassium iodine) as follows:

-KIO3 is not bitter

-KIO3 is heat stable

-KIO3 has a longer shelf life

-KIO3 does not typically induce nausea

"I've tried ordinary KI in the past and, although it's also effective in a radioactive event, it's pretty bitter," said Sciacca. "Chuck and I both consumed a KIO3 tablet during the interview and there is no bitter taste."

Sciacca noted that KIO3 is more expensive than regular KI, but given the longer shelf life and lack of a bitter taste, he feels that the greater cost is a worthwhile trade-off.

"We'll continue to sell both KI and KIO3 at CampingSurvival.com, but I definitely like the advantages of KIO3," he said. "Most of all, I want people to watch the interview and have people get informed on why having KI or KIO3 in your emergency supplies is a great idea."

The full interview can be found here:

http://www.campingsurvival.com/nucprot.html

Sciacca, a former Marine and veteran of the 1991 Gulf War, launched CampingSurvival.com in 2002, and quickly earned a reputation as an online authority on camping and wilderness survival gear, creating a loyal following of customers.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/KIO3/chuck-fenwick/prweb10922769.htm


Source: prweb



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