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Google Book Ruling ‘Excellent’ For Learning, Goal of Copyright Law: John Marshall Law School Intellectual Property Professor

November 14, 2013

Google, Inc.’s win Thursday in a lawsuit over the company’s posting millions of books online is a win for authors and the goal of learning, according to an intellectual property professor at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago.

(PRWEB) November 14, 2013

Google, Inc.’s win Thursday in a lawsuit over the company’s posting millions of books online is a win for authors and the goal of learning, according to an intellectual property professor at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago.

William McGrath, associate director of John Marshall’s Center for Intellectual Property Law and a partner at Davis McGrath LLC, said: “This decision is an excellent example of a court achieving the ultimate goal of copyright law – to promote the dissemination of knowledge and the advancement of learning. The Google books technology is a wonderful tool that has opened up huge advances in the ability to search complete texts. It was a bold move for Google to proceed with this project back in 2004, and the court’s opinion validates Google’s decision.”

A judge in the U.S. District Court in Manhattan ruled against the Authors Guild, Inc., saying that Google did not violate copyright laws and that its scanning of more than 20 million books was protected by fair use standards.

McGrath said: “In concluding that this is a fair use under the Copyright Act, the court points out the many benefits of this technology in facilitating research, expanding access to old and out-of-print books, and benefiting underserved populations such as print-disabled individuals by allowing them to gain knowledge of and access to far more books. Google Books is not a tool used to read books, so it should not be expected to harm authors by usurping their market. If anything, it will benefit authors because it facilitates the purchase of books that researchers find using Google’s text-searching capabilities. Key to the court’s ruling is its finding that the digitization of the books is ‘transformative’ under the fair use doctrine, turning regular book text into searchable data.”

The judge’s ruling commended the benefits of Google’s book program, noting: “Indeed, Google Books has become such an important tool for researchers and librarians that it has been integrated into the educational system — it is taught as part of the information literacy curriculum to students at all levels.”

For more information about William T. McGrath, go to http://www.jmls.edu/directory/profiles/mcgrath-william/

Case information: The Authors Guild, Inc. v. Google, Inc. (1:05-CV-08136-DC)

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/11/prweb11337135.htm


Source: prweb



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