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Two Al-Qaeda Truck Bombs on the Loose ; Exclusive

September 26, 2008

By CHRIS HUGHES

TWO massive lorry bombs are primed to cause more carnage in Pakistan in the wake of the Marriott Hotel attack.

Intelligence chiefs in Britain and America have been told al- Qaeda is planning more outrages in the capital Islamabad.

Pakistani security forces are desperately trying to find the trucks, which are thought to be ready and waiting.

A UK intelligence source said: “There is credible information that two lorries have been set up as bombs. It is believed they are for a simultaneous attack or with one blowing a hole in security to make way for the second larger one.

“Al-Qaeda has perfected this method of dual blasts in Baghdad.”

If both trucks strike the same target the casualties could exceed the 53 killed and 270 wounded in the Marriott truck blast.

Fears of a new strike have prompted a massive security clampdown of Pakistan’s airports.

And US government staff have been told not to visit any hotel in Islamabad or the cities of Karachi and Peshawar, which are also under threat.

A militant group calling itself Islam’s Commandos yesterday claimed responsibility for the Marriott bombing. It also threatened more attacks, reiterating a warning that Pakistanis should stop cooperating with the West.

A spokesman warned: “All those who will facilitate Americans and Nato crusaders will keep receiving the blows.”

In the wake of the attack, the US has stepped up a campaign against extremist training camps in the tribal regions along Pakistan’s border with Afghanistan.

There have been six missile attacks and a helicopter-borne ground assault recently, launched from inside Afghanistan.

Pakistan has warned it will not tolerate infringement of its territory and promised to stand up to border aggression.

Yesterday Nato helicopters were fired on from a Pakistani military checkpoint along border.

The coalition choppers came under small arms fire.

A Nato spokesman later insisted the helicopters had not crossed into Pakistani airspace.

(c) 2008 Daily Mirror. Provided by ProQuest LLC. All rights Reserved.




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