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New Research Shows Type 2 Diabetes Medication Reduces Blood Glucose Safely as Reported by DiabeticLive.com

September 21, 2011

A recent Phase III investigation by has demonstrated that a new medication for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes significantly lowers blood glucose levels in adults while exhibiting few side effects and maintaining positive results over the duration of the study as reported by DiabeticLive.com.

Tampa, FL (PRWEB) September 21, 2011

New Type 2 Diabetes Medication Reduces Blood Glucose Safely: A recent Phase III investigation has demonstrated that a new medication for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes significantly lowers blood glucose levels in adults while exhibiting few side effects and maintaining positive results over the duration of the study. Linagliptin (trade name Trajenta® in Europe), developed by Boehringer Ingelheim and marketed by Eli Lilly and Company, is a DPP-4 inhibitor; it displayed a positive safety profile and a reduction in HbA1c levels of 0.8% throughout the duration of the study. The findings were presented at the 47th annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) by Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly.

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David Owens, a clinical professor working with the Department of Medicine at Cardiff University School of Medicine in Wales, is optimistic about linagliptin’s efficacy, both in the short and long-term:

“These results show that the efficacy achieved by linagliptin is reliable and meaningful in a clinical setting, but also that it is durable over the long term. This is especially important in chronic conditions such as type 2 diabetes.”

The study demonstrated that linagliptin was effective as a treatment for Type 2 diabetes and that it was well-tolerated by patients and offered significant results throughout the study, which lasted 102 weeks. Linagliptin was tested by itself, as a dual treatment with metformin or pioglitazone, and as a supplement to treatment with metformin and sulphonylurea. Twenty-four weeks into the study, patients displayed a 0.8% reduction in HbA1c levels. The reduction in blood glucose lasted throughout the remaining 78 weeks of the study. Patients experienced few hypoglycemic events; body weight for most of the patients stayed fairly stable.

Researchers also conducted a 12 week study of linagliptin’s effectiveness and tolerance in patients who had been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and were taking metformin twice daily. Patients were either given linagliptin 2.5mg to take twice a day (so that dosage would coincide with metformin dosage) or linagliptin 5mg to take once daily. Results were similar across both groups, with the group taking linagilptin twice daily showing a 0.74% decrease in HbA1c and the group taking linagliptin once daily showing a 0.8% decrease in HbA1c.

Professor Anthony Barnett, consultant physician at Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust and Emeritus Professor of Medicine at the University of Birmingham in the U.K, also commented on the results of the trial:

“Linagliptin is a new treatment that is primarily excreted unmetabolised via the bile and gut, and so delivers reliable HbA1c reductions at one dosage strength for all patients, even for those with declining hepatic or renal function. One dosage strength for all patients will help make the process of prescribing easier and more straightforward for physicians.”

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prwebType2-Diabetes/Medication/prweb8811936.htm


Source: prweb



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