Quantcast

Algorithm for Estimating Mealtime Insulin Dose More Effective than Carb Counting as Reported by DiabeticLive.com

October 7, 2011

A team of researchers at the University of Sydney in Australia has discovered a new food insulin index (FII) algorithm for use in estimating the amount of insulin that Type 1 diabetics should receive when eating meals as reported by DiabeticLive.com.

Orlando, FL (PRWEB) October 07, 2011

Algorithm for Estimating Mealtime Insulin Dose More Effective than Carb Counting: A team of researchers at the University of Sydney in Australia has discovered a new food insulin index (FII) algorithm for use in estimating the amount of insulin that Type 1 diabetics should receive when eating meals. The algorithm was proven in a study to be more effective than carbohydrate counting in maintaining normal blood glucose levels after meals high in carbohydrate content.

Sign up for a free glucose meter at DiabeticLive.com.

Headed by Jiansong Bao, the study followed 28 adult men and women who had Type 1 diabetes and used insulin pumps. The new algorithm was developed as a more accurate method of taking into consideration the carbohydrate content of a meal and estimating an accurate dosage of insulin to keep blood glucose levels under control.

Study participants received a breakfast meal each morning over a period of three days. Two different meals were used, one with high carbohydrate content (75g) and one with moderate carbohydrate content (41g). The meals were otherwise similar in fiber, glycemic index, calculated insulin demand, and total energy. Participants were randomly assigned the high-carbohydrate meal for one of the days and the moderate-carbohydrate meal for the other two days.

Carbohydrate counting was used to estimate the proper mealtime insulin dosage for the high-carbohydrate meal while the new FII algorithm was used in determining proper insulin dosage for the other two meals. The researchers used continuous blood glucose monitors to keep track of postprandial glycemia (blood glucose levels after a meal) for three hours after the participants ate breakfast.

The research team discovered that the FII algorithm demonstrated a significant improvement in decreasing peak glucose excursion and glucose incremental area under the curve in the three hours after the meal when blood glucose was monitored. When the algorithm was used to estimate insulin dosage, patients spent significantly more time in normal blood glucose ranges after eating. Hypoglycemia was not significantly different between the two insulin management plans.

“An insulin algorithm based on physiological insulin demand evoked by foods in healthy subjects may be a useful tool for estimating mealtime insulin dose in patients with type 1 diabetes,” said the study’s authors.

Carbohydrate counting has been used by diabetics for years to ensure that blood glucose levels remain under control. Since foods high in carbohydrate content cause blood glucose levels to spike, they can be dangerous to diabetics. Most diabetics are advised to eat about 45-50 grams of carbohydrate in a normal meal. Doctors also advise diabetics to avoid saturated fats, trans fats, and sodium.

###

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prwebCarb-Counting/Diabetes/prweb8858510.htm


Source: prweb



comments powered by Disqus