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Scientists Clone Embryonic Stem Cells from Individuals To Aid In Cure For Diabetes as Reported by DiabeticLive.com

October 8, 2011

The successful cloning could prove to be an important step in the development of therapies using embryonic stem cells to replace damaged or defective tissues in the human body, which could possibly cure a range of diseases and illnesses including diabetes as reported by DiabeticLive.com.

Orlando, FL (PRWEB) October 08, 2011

Scientists Clone Embryonic Stem Cells from Individuals: A team of scientists has successfully cloned embryonic stem cells that contain the DNA of specific individuals, they reported on October 5. The successful cloning could prove to be an important step in the development of therapies using embryonic stem cells to replace damaged or defective tissues in the human body, which could possibly cure a range of diseases and illnesses.

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According to a recent article in the Washington Post, the cells produced by the scientists in their research were genetically abnormal and are not ready for use in real-world applications in humans. The discovery could still set the stage for the next wave of development in embryonic stem cell technology.

Embryonic stem cell research has caused much controversy over the years in fields such as bioethics and politics. In this study, scientists paid women to provide eggs for the research. Some were concerned that the experiments were exploiting women and putting their health at risk while others were concerned about the use of embryos to create stem cells. The eggs donated by the women were used to grow embryos from which stem cells were extracted; after the stem cells were removed, the embryos were destroyed. There are many opponents to the use and ultimate destruction of embryos for the purposes of stem cell research, who believe that destroying an embryo is essentially ending a human life.

âœThey have created human embryos. They are abnormal, but they are still human embryos,â said Daniel P. Sulmasy, a professor of medicine and ethics at the University of Chicago. âœAnyone who is opposed to the deliberate creation and destruction of human embryos, as I am, would be opposed to this research.â

Many more scientists and supporters of stem cell research heralded the experiment as an important development in the field. The researchers were praised for their thoroughness in conducting the experiment and for pursuing research that could set the stage for large strides in the field.

âœI think it will teach us a lot about how to control the generation of all the different cell types that we would like to study and use for therapy,â said Lawrence Goldstein, the director of the stem cell research program at the University of California at San Diego. âœI think itâs a really exciting development.”

The process is sometimes called therapeutic cloning, and utilizes eggs donated from women which have had their genetic information removed. The recipient’s DNA is implanted into the egg, which is then stimulated into growing and producing embryonic cells. The cells are extracted and the embryo is destroyed.

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prwebDiabetes/Embryonic-Stem-Cells/prweb8862769.htm


Source: prweb



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