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Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 17:35 EDT

Family History and Mammograms

May 9, 2012

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — A new study shows more than half the women aged 40-49 diagnosed with breast cancer reported no family history.

The study, conducted at Elizabeth Wende Breast Care, LLC in Rochester, NY, found that 228 out of 373 cancers (61%) were found in women, aged 40-49 with no family history of breast cancer. Seventeen of the 228 patients did have a prior personal history of breast cancer or abnormal cells at a prior biopsy, and were not included in this analysis.

“Out of 211 women that remained for this study, 135(64%) who did not have a prior personal history of breast cancer or abnormal cells, and had no family history of breast cancer, had invasive disease,” Stamatia Destounis, MD, the lead author of the study, was quoted saying. “Invasive disease includes invasive ductal, invasive lobular, mucinous, tubular and papillary cancers.”

Ninety-two of the patients with invasive disease were treated with lumpectomy, eight going on to mastectomy after close or positive margins; 42 had a mastectomy and one patient did not have surgery due to metastatic disease.

“We have follow-up imaging available for 149 of the 211 patients, and 144 are doing well; five have been diagnosed with new or recurrent cancer,” Dr. Destounis was quoted saying. “We decided to look at our patients diagnosed with breast cancer in the 40-49 age groups in lieu of recent proposed changes with mammography screening guidelines and the scrutiny over screening mammography,” said Dr. Destounis. “We weren’t surprised by the results of the study, but the data do confirm that women in their 40s benefit from screening mammography yearly,” she added.

SOURCE: American Roentgen Ray Society, May, 2012