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Mayo Clinic Urologists Present Findings At American Urological Association Annual Meeting

May 23, 2012

Studies on kidney stones, prostate cancer among highlights

Mayo Clinic researchers will present findings on prostate cancer risk, screening, treatment and other urological research at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association May 19-23 in Atlanta. Mayo Clinic urologists will also be available to provide expert comment for reporters covering the conference.

Mayo Clinic studies that will be presented and their embargo dates include:

No negative impact on overall survival from post-prostate surgery hormone therapy
Embargoed until 10:30 a.m. ET Monday, May 21

In a first-of-its-kind study of adjuvant hormonal therapy (AHT) following radical prostatectomy, Mayo Clinic researchers found no adverse impact in overall survival of patients even when other health factors, specifically cardiovascular disease, were taken into account. AHT treatment controls testosterone production in patients who have undergone radical prostatectomy in order to prevent or slow the return of cancer cells. For the study, “Adjuvant Hormonal Therapy Does Not Adversely Impact Overall Survival Following Radical Prostatectomy for Men with High Risk Prostate Cancer When Stratified by Charlson Comorbidity Index or Cardiovascular Risk Factors,” researchers reviewed the history of 1,247 patients who had prostate surgery at Mayo Clinic from 1988 to 2004. The review included the outcomes of patients who received AHT after prostate surgery and their cardiovascular disease history.

“Knowing the cardiovascular disease history allowed us to distinguish which factor negatively impacted the overall survival — the cancer or the cardiovascular disease,” says lead author Jeffrey Karnes, M.D., a Mayo urologist. The study found the 10-year overall survival rate among patients with cardiovascular disease who received AHT was 72 percent; it was 76 percent for those with cardiovascular disease who did not receive AHT. Similarly, for patients without cardiovascular disease the 10-year overall survival among patients who received ATH was 74 percent, compared to a 79 percent 10-year survival rate for those who did not receive AHT.

Young men with low PSA level at very low risk of prostate cancer
Embargoed until 1 p.m. ET, Monday, May 21
MULTIMEDIA ALERT: Video of interview excerpts is available on the Mayo Clinic News Network.

Three-fourths of young men ages 40




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