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Possible Cause Found For Chronic Rhinosinusitis

June 19, 2012

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Chronic Rhinosinusitis (CRS), an inflammation of the nasal and paranasal sinuses lasting over 12 weeks, lands more than 500,000 in the emergency room in the U.S. annually. Now, a new study attempts to crack the case of what is causing it.

Patients suffering from CRS experience a variety of symptoms including congestion, fatigue, and even depression and it can lead to other conditions such as asthma, meningitis and aneurysms. According to the researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, patients suffering from this disease appear to have a depleted nasal microbiome inside their nose that is causing it.

“With the fast-growing body of literature that demonstrates associations between the human microbiome composition and several diseases such as asthma and obesity, we hypothesized that a nasal microbiome exists and plays a role in CRS development,” Nabeetha Nagalingam, a researcher on the study was quoted saying.

In this study, Nagalingam and colleagues compared the nasal microbial communities of 10 CRS patients and 10 healthy individuals. They found that patients with CRS had a depleted nasal microbiome, characterized by a significant reduction in bacterial diversity and an overgrowth of one type of bacteria, Corynebacterium spp.

“We investigated our hypothesis that C. tuberculostearicum in the setting of a depleted microbiome can induce pathophysiology consistent with sinusitis using a mouse model,” Nagalingam added.

To recreate a depleted microbiome, mice were administered antibiotics for 7 days before they were infected with C. tuberculostearicum. Mice who were given the antibiotic before exposure displayed symptoms of sinusitis. Mice that were not first treated with antibiotics but exposed to the bacteria did not.

“From our human microbiome comparative profiling, we noted that lactic acid bacteria, including Lactobacillus sakei, were significantly depleted in patients with CRS and postulated that this bacterium may have a protective role against CRS development,” Nagalingam was quoted saying.

Once again using the mouse model they showed that L. sakei inhibited the growth of C. tuberculostearicum and could prevent infection, even with a depleted nasal microbiome.

These findings suggest a possible approach for prevention or management of CRS.

Source: 2012 General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, June 2012




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