Quantcast

Many Veterans Are Returning With Substance Abuse Issues

June 21, 2013

Many veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan are suffering from substance abuse. Anyone who is experiencing a dependency issue should contact a detox center like Harbor Village to begin the recovery process.

Miami, Florida (PRWEB) June 21, 2013

As reported by Buffalo Business First (6/18), many veterans are returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with a substance abuse issue. The University of Buffalo will be conducting research as to why this is occurring. The National Institute of Drug Abuse is providing a $2.3 million grant to fund the research, which will be conducted from June 2013 to February 2018.

Previous research by the Veterans Administration determined that the number one health problem of returning Iraq and Afghanistan was substance abuse. The breakdown on the level of drinking among returning military personnel was startling with 44.5% reported binge drinking, 19% said they were heavy drinkers in the past month and 7.5 % admitted they were chronic drinkers.

At Harbor Village, clients with substance abuse problems can check in and begin a proven step-by-step program to help them become sober. The facility addresses both alcohol and drug addiction in their beautiful South Florida setting. A 24/7 medically supervised detox center, Harbor Village allows each client to experience detoxification in a luxury, state-of-the art environment. Clients are welcomed with upscale accommodations including an attractively furnished suite complete with satellite television, 30,000 square feet of outdoor lounge area, spa, salon, massage and acupuncture services, nutritious, gourmet dining and the personalized support of a caring, attentive staff.

The study will focus on why reserve military personnel returning from overseas are more likely to suffer from mental and substance abuse issues than active duty military personnel. Among the issues to be studied are the social and environmental influences, stress, trauma and partner and peer substance abuse. About 400 military personnel and their spouses are expected to participate including male and female personnel involved in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF).

Several theories have already been set forth on why returning soldiers experience higher levels of substance abuse. Gregory Homish, an assistant professor in the department of community health and health behavior, said, “Researchers have speculated that difficulties transitioning back into civilian and family life may be responsible for the increased risk observed in reserve soldiers relative to active duty soldiers. Among these difficulties is trying to handle the absence of support from other soldiers.”

“A substance abuse problem doesn't have to ruin your life. Contact a detox center such as Harbor Village and receive the care you need,” said Robert Niznik, Harbor Village CEO.

For more information, visit: http://harborvillageflorida.com ; or call the 24/7 hotline at 1-855-338-6900.

Media Contact: 

Robert Niznik 

Harbor Village 

Miami, FL 

305-999-5728 

robert(at)harborvillageflorida(dot)com

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2013/6/prweb10845250.htm


Source: prweb



comments powered by Disqus