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Pregnant Women Who Use Nasal Decongestants During the First Trimester May Increase Their Babies’ Risks of Birth Defects; Parker Waichman LLP Is Evaluating Legal Claims

July 25, 2013

Pregnant women who use nasal decongestants during the first trimester may be raising the risk that their newborn will suffer from one or more rare birth defects, according to a Reuters report about a new study. National law firm Parker Waichman LLP is now evaluating legal claims.

New York, New York (PRWEB) July 25, 2013

Parker Waichman LLP, a national law firm dedicated to protecting the rights of victims injured by defective drugs, notes that women who use nasal decongestants during the first trimester of their pregnancy may be raising the risk that their newborn will suffer from one or more rare birth defects, according to a new study written about in a July 23 Reuters report. Researchers at the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University found that phenylephrine, which is used in Sudafed, is associated with an eightfold increased risk of a heart deficiency called endocardial cushion defect when used in the first trimester. Acutrim, which contains phenylpropanolamine, was linked to an eightfold-higher risk of ear and stomach defects.

According to the Reuters report, this study claims that a threefold increased risk of limb reduction defects also is linked to first-trimester use of pseudophedrine, another Sudafed ingredient. In addition, imidazolines, which is used in nasal decongestant sprays and eye drops, was linked to a twofold increased risk of a defect that causes an abnormal connection between the trachea and the esophagus.

The study analyzed data from 12,700 infants born with non-chromosomal birth defects between 1993 and 2010, which was then compared to 7,600 infants without deformities, Reuters reported. One researcher told Reuters that he believes there is enough information now available that doctors should avoid prescribing nasal decongestants to pregnant women, although he concedes that this should be determined on an individual basis.

If you or a loved one took a nasal decongestant during your first trimester and gave birth to a child with non-chromosomal defects such as mentioned above, you have valuable legal rights. Please fill out our online form, or call 1-800-LAW-INFO (1-800-529-4636) to discuss your case with one of our nasal decongestant birth defects lawyers today.

Contact:

Parker Waichman LLP

Gary Falkowitz, Managing Attorney

(800) LAW-INFO

(800) 529-4636

http://www.yourlawyer.com

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/nasal_decongestants/pregnant_defects/prweb10966976.htm


Source: prweb



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