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Foot Health: What’s normal? What’s not?

August 23, 2013

Orthopaedic foot and ankle MDs review foot changes and conditions

ROSEMONT, Ill., Aug. 23, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Did you know the average person takes roughly 10,000 steps per day? That adds up to more than 3 million steps per year, and each step places two to three times the force of your body weight on your feet.

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Over time, this repetitive use can lead to normal changes, including widening of the feet, settling of the arches and some stiffening of the ankles.

But some changes aren’t a normal part of the aging process. Foot problems such as bunions, hammertoes, Morton’s neuroma and even arthritis can occur with long-term use of ill-fitting shoes. Meanwhile, conditions such as athlete’s foot, warts and fungal infections of the toenail can occur at any age and should be treated promptly, say members of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS).

For details on spotting abnormal foot conditions and how orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons treat them, visit the Adult Foot Health page at FootCareMD, the patient education website of the AOFAS.

About the AOFAS
The AOFAS promotes quality, ethical and cost-effective patient care through the education, research and training of orthopaedic surgeons and other health care providers. The Society creates public awareness for the prevention and treatment of foot and ankle disorders, provides leadership, and serves as a resource for government and industry as well as the national and international health care communities.?

About Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Surgeons
Orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons are medical doctors (MD and DO) who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries of the foot and ankle. Orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons use medical, physical and rehabilitative methods as well as surgery to treat patients of all ages. Relying on four years of medical school training, five years of post-graduate training and often a fellowship in orthopaedic foot and ankle care, orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons perform reconstructive procedures, treat sports injuries, and manage and treat trauma of the foot and ankle.

Contact:
Jennifer Hicks
Public Education Manager
Office: 847-384-4379
jhicks@aofas.org

SOURCE American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society


Source: PR Newswire