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New Survey Reveals the Effects of Prostate Cancer Go Beyond the Physical, Leading to Feelings of Loss of Masculinity and Loss of Identity

September 23, 2013

TORONTO, Sept. 23, 2013 /CNW/ – Prostate cancer can impact quality of
life, affecting patients’ day-to-day life and overall well-being.
According to a new national survey of men who have or have had prostate
cancer, the condition’s physical manifestations can also lead to
psychological and social concerns, both of which are more pronounced
for those in the later stages of the disease, when the tumour has
metastasized or spread beyond the prostate.

The most reported physical concern (64 per cent) for all men surveyed is
being unable to maintain an erection; however, for men with advanced
(stages 3 and 4) prostate cancer, the psychological concerns (69 per
cent) and social concerns (50 per cent) are just as important, and
include feelings of loss of masculinity, loss of dignity and loss of
identity, and missing out on important life events.(1)

“Intuitively, we know quality of life is a concern for men with prostate
cancer, but these survey results are important because they reveal the
burden on quality of life over the course of the disease,” says Jackie
Manthorne, President and CEO, Canadian Cancer Survivor Network. “By
acknowledging and understanding the unique challenges and concerns that
men with early and advanced stage prostate cancer face, we can provide
better support throughout all stages of the disease.”

The Burden of Prostate Cancer Over the Course of the Disease

More than one-third of all men living with prostate cancer (36 per cent)
say the disease has impacted their ability to participate in daily
activities, such as using the bathroom, being physically active and
travelling.(2)

Furthermore, the impact the disease has on quality of life is much
greater for those living with advanced prostate cancer than early stage
prostate cancer (stages 1 and 2). In fact, the majority of men with
prostate cancer (70 per cent) in the early stage of the disease report
having an excellent or very good quality of life compared to only 39
per cent of those with advanced prostate cancer.(3) Among those with early stage prostate cancer, sexual dysfunction,
urinary incontinence, and fatigue are the most common physical
challenges experienced; however, the impact is far greater for those
living with advanced prostate cancer.(4)

While 84 per cent of all men surveyed feel they are living their lives
to the fullest,(5) many reported that they are unable to enjoy life,(6) including 50 per cent of men with advanced prostate cancer and 19 per
cent of men with early stage prostate cancer.(7)

“When I was diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer, the news came
with such a force in my life,” says Don Konantz, from Vancouver. “The
emasculating side effects of this disease can be very real. Working
closely with my doctor has helped me navigate the treatments associated
with this complicated and sometimes overwhelming diagnosis and
supported me in living life the best I can.”

Working Together for Prostate Cancer Care

Caregivers play an active role in the lives of their loved ones with
prostate cancer. The survey found that caregivers provide approximately
25 hours of care per week and that the majority of them (69 per cent)
are spouses.(8) Beyond providing encouragement and emotional support, almost
seven-in-ten (65 per cent) attend doctor visits and over half (57 per
cent) are involved in the treatment decisions of their loved ones.(9) At least monthly, one-third of caregivers keep up-to-date on medication
and treatment options and learn about the disease.(1)

The survey also revealed that more than half of men with prostate cancer
(56 per cent) and caregivers (57 per cent) wish better treatment
options were available.(11) This figure dramatically increases to 92 per cent for men who identify
themselves as having advanced prostate cancer.(12 )

“Being able to enjoy time with family and friends and create memories is
paramount for men living with prostate cancer, particularly those at
the advanced stages who may not have the benefit of time” says Dr. Alan
So*, research scientist, Prostate Centre at Vancouver General Hospital
and associate professor, Department of Urologic Sciences at the
University of British Columbia. “It’s important that men and their
caregivers speak with their doctors about the latest treatment advances
that delay disease progression, but also improve quality of life and
survival time.”

About the Prostate Cancer Quality of Life Patient and Caregiver Survey

The survey was conducted between June 21 and July 7, 2013, by Leger
Marketing on behalf of Janssen Inc., and in partnership with the Canadian Cancer Survivor Network (CCSN), a national network working together by taking action to promote the
very best standard of care, support, follow up and quality of life for
cancer patients and survivors, and PROCURE, a Quebec-based group that provides science and humanity with means to
help prevent and cure prostate cancer.

The survey used an online questionnaire to poll 517 Canadian men who
currently have or have had prostate cancer (including 73 men with stage
1 and 2, 26 men with stage 3 and 4 prostate cancer, and 418 men with no
current evidence of the disease or prefer not to answer) as well as 256
caregivers. A probability sample of prostate cancer patients of the
same size would yield a margin of error of +/- 4.3 per cent, 19 times
out of 20. A probability sample of caregivers of the same size would
yield a margin of error of +/- 6.1 per cent.

About Prostate Cancer in Canada

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer to afflict men in Canada and
approximately 23,600 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer annually.(13) According to the Canadian Cancer Society, prostate cancer is turning up
in men in their 40s and on average, 65 Canadian men are diagnosed with
prostate cancer every day, and 11 men die of prostate cancer every day.(14)  Approximately 10 to 20 per cent of prostate cancer cases will present
with metastatic disease, in which the tumour spreads beyond the
prostate.(15) Fortunately, death rates have been declining since the mid-1990s.(16)

About Janssen Inc.

At Janssen, we are dedicated to addressing and solving some of the most
important unmet medical needs of our time in oncology, immunology,
neuroscience, infectious diseases and vaccines, metabolic and chronic
diseases and women’s health.  Driven by our commitment to patients, we
bring innovative products, services and solutions to people throughout
the world.  Janssen Inc. is a member of the Janssen Pharmaceutical
Companies.  Please visit www.janssen.ca for more information.

*Dr. So was not compensated for any media work. He has been a paid
consultant to Janssen Inc.

References

(_______________________________ )

(1) The “Prostate Cancer – Quality of Life Patient and Caregiver Study” was
conducted through an online survey by Leger Marketing between June 21st
and July 7th, 2013 with 517 Canadian men who currently have or have had
prostate cancer (including 73 men with stage 1 and 2 and 26 men with
stage 3 and 4 prostate cancer) and 256 caregivers. A probability sample
of prostate cancer patients of the same size would yield a margin of
error of +/- 4.3%, 19 times out of 20. A probability sample of
caregivers of the same size would yield a margin of error of +/- 6.1%.

(2) Ibid.

(3) Ibid.

(4) Ibid.

(5) Ibid.

(6) Ibid.

(7) Ibid.

(8) Ibid.

(9) Ibid.

(10 )Ibid.

(11) Ibid.

(12) Ibid.

(13) Canadian Cancer Society.  Prostate Cancer Statistics at a glance. 
Available at: http://www.cancer.ca/Canada-wide/About%20cancer/Cancer%20statistics/Stats%20at%20a%20glance/Prostate%20cancer.aspx?sc_lang=en. Last accessed August 19, 2013.

(14) Ibid.

(15) Bellmunt J, Charles J, Albanell J. Predictive modelling in
hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). Clin Transl Oncol. 2009
Feb;11(2):82-5.

(16) Canadian Cancer Society.  Prostate Cancer Statistics at a glance. 
Available at: http://www.cancer.ca/Canada-wide/About%20cancer/Cancer%20statistics/Stats%20at%20a%20glance/Prostate%20cancer.aspx?sc_lang=en. Last accessed March 13, 2013.

SOURCE Janssen Inc.

Video with caption: “Video: Three Canadian men living with advanced prostate cancer share their unique stories of hope and inspiration and the impact the condition has on their quality of life.”. Video available at: http://stream1.newswire.ca/cgi-bin/playback.cgi?file=20130923_C9404_VIDEO_EN_31154.mp4&posterurl=http://photos.newswire.ca/images/20130923_C9404_PHOTO_EN_31154.jpg&clientName=Janssen%20Inc%2E&caption=Video%3A%20Three%20Canadian%20men%20living%20with%20advanced%20prostate%20cancer%20share%20their%20unique%20stories%20of%20hope%20and%20inspiration%20and%20the%20impact%20the%20condition%20has%20on%20their%20quality%20of%20life%2E&title=JANSSEN%20INC%2E%20%2D%20New%20Survey%20Reveals%20the%20Effects%20of%20Prostate%20Cancer%20Go%20Beyond%20the%20Physical%2C%20Leading%20to%20Feelings%20of%20Loss%20of%20Masculinity%20and%20Loss%20of%20Identity&headline=New%20Survey%20Reveals%20the%20Effects%20of%20Prostate%20Cancer%20Go%20Beyond%20the%20Physical%2C%20Leading%20to%20Feelings%20of%20Loss%20of%20Masculinity%20and%20Loss%20of%20Identity

Image with caption: “Advanced Prostate Cancer Infographic (CNW Group/Janssen Inc.)”. Image available at: http://photos.newswire.ca/images/download/20130923_C9404_PHOTO_EN_31144.jpg


Source: PR Newswire