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1 In 3 Women Experience Bladder Weakness From Pregnancy

December 17, 2013

Women who have had just one baby are three times more likely to experience bladder weakness issues than women who have never been pregnant, due to increased pressure placed on the pelvic floor. And sadly, 31.3% of women believe they will suffer bladder weakness forever if it occurs to them during pregnancy, according to a new survey of over 500 New Zealand women carried out by lights™ by TENA®.

Auckland, New Zealand (PRWEB) December 17, 2013

Women who have had just one baby are three times more likely to experience bladder weakness issues than women who have never been pregnant, due to increased pressure placed on the pelvic floor. And sadly, 31.3% of women believe they will suffer bladder weakness forever if it occurs to them during pregnancy, according to a new survey of over 500 New Zealand women carried out by lights™ by TENA®.

Jane Le Fevre, Physiotherapist Expert for lights™ by TENA® says, "This new research is concerning as it indicates that a huge portion of women view bladder weakness as a never ending problem that can’t be treated. This is not the case. By carrying out regular exercises to strengthen the pelvic floor, women can regain control and in many cases, prevent leaks happening altogether. "

The research went on to show that 58.4% of New Zealand women feel too embarrassed to talk or do anything about bladder weakness.

Acknowledging the fact that New Zealand females are highly reluctant to talk about the ‘little problem they don’t have, lights™ by TENA ® have launched a first of its kind educational campaign to help soon to be and new mothers understand the problem, and empower them with the tools to overcome it, without the need to share or discuss the issue far and wide.

Only 37.2% of women who previously gave birth received a pamphlet advising them about pelvic floor exercise. Just 15.6% had their doctor actually show them how to do the exercises. Alarmingly, 16.8% did not receive any advice from their doctor at all about handling bladder weakness after giving birth.

"Bladder weakness is an extremely common issue for women to experience when pregnant and after giving birth. It is not something they simply must accept. New mums have so much going on in their everyday lives, it’s easy to ignore light bladder leakages and pretend it’s not happening. But by acknowledging the problem, they can seek a solution and take control of their situation," continues Mrs. Le Fevre.

Mrs. Le Fevre has the following tips for expectant and new mothers experiencing bladder weakness to combat the problem:

1.    Find the Pelvic Floor

The Pelvic Floor runs from the pubic bone at the front of the pelvis to the coccyx at the back. Imagine this sling of muscles is like two elevator doors. As it's been lifted, imagine the doors closing together and then lifting upwards. The rest of the body should stay still.

2.    Practice

Practice lifting the pelvic floor daily, both strong fast and slow gentle contractions throughout the day. The pelvic floor has to work harder to support the growing baby and changing body so it’s a perfect time to keep it active and strong.

Practicing lifting the pelvic floor regularly during pregnancy will help to regain pelvic floor control after the birth of a baby.

3.    Lift baby and pelvic floor

Every time a baby is lifted, lift the pelvic floor. This will help to regain control as well as protect the back.

4.    Patience

Be patient with the pelvic floor after birth. If it doesn't feel good with your pelvic floor by 6 weeks post partum talk to a GP or see a women’s health physiotherapist to get help.

5.    Use the right product while dealing with the problem

Use a correct liner such as one from the newly launched lights™ by TENA® range to handle the leakages while dealing with the problem. The liners will keep it drier, fresher and odour free. And much less stressed.

For more expert tips and video demonstrations on how to strengthen the pelvic floor, visit http://www.lightsbyTENA.co.nz.

"Many women tend to use a sanitary pad or toilet paper when they experience bladder weakness but this can result in discomfort and a bad odor. New lights™ by TENA® are specially designed to provide a discreet, thin and reliable liner to hold leaks, while keeping odor at bay," concludes Mrs. Le Fevre.

For further information on lights by TENA® and an opportunity to receive a complimentary sample liner, visit http://www.lightsbyTENA.co.nz.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/12/prweb11424199.htm


Source: prweb



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