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Interdisciplinary Critical Care Societies Identify Five Common Clinical Practices to Reconsider

January 28, 2014

Critical Care Societies Collaborative issues list of clinical practices to question as part of Choosing Wisely® initiative

ALISO VIEJO, Calif., Jan. 28, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) — as part of the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) — has identified five routine critical care practices that should be questioned because they may not always be necessary and could, in fact, be harmful.

Its efforts support Choosing Wisely®, an initiative of the ABIM Foundation intended to spur conversations between patients and healthcare providers on what tests and procedures are really necessary. AACN is the first nursing organization to collaborate on development of a Choosing Wisely list.

CCSC is a multidisciplinary organization composed of AACN, American College of Chest Physicians, American Thoracic Society and Society of Critical Care Medicine.

Its Choosing Wisely list includes five evidence-based recommendations that offer guidance to multidisciplinary teams of critical care professionals. The recommendations are:

    --  Don't order diagnostic tests at regular intervals (such as every day),
        but rather in response to specific clinical questions.
    --  Don't transfuse red blood cells in hemodynamically stable, non-bleeding
        critically ill patients with a hemoglobin concentration greater than 7
        mg/dL.
    --  Don't use parenteral nutrition in adequately nourished critically ill
        patients within the first seven days of a stay in an intensive care
        unit.
    --  Don't deeply sedate mechanically ventilated patients without a specific
        indication and without daily attempts to lighten sedation.
    --  Don't continue life support for patients at high risk for death or
        severely impaired functional recovery without offering patients and
        their families the alternative of care focused entirely on comfort.

The list, including more detailed explanations and supporting references, can be found online at ChoosingWisely.org. A downloadable PDF, suitable for use in staff meetings and posting, is also available.

“A unique feature of this contribution to the Choosing Wisely initiative by the Critical Care Societies Collaborative is that the document represents the interdisciplinary collaboration of nursing and medical societies,” said Ramón Lavandero, RN, MA, MSN, FAAN, AACN senior director and clinical associate professor, Yale University School of Nursing, New Haven, Conn. “This aligns with the standard for true collaboration in AACN Standards for Establishing and Sustaining Healthy Work Environments.”

A CCSC task force with 10 members representing all four societies and the disciplines of internal medicine, surgery, anesthesiology, emergency medicine and critical care nursing developed the list over the past year after careful consideration of the latest evidence, expert opinions and research.

The CCSC recommendations join the growing library of more than 220 tests and procedures that have been identified as possibly unnecessary and potentially harmful and, therefore, may require further discussion between patients and physicians.

“The specialty societies partnering in the Choosing Wisely campaign have shown tremendous leadership by answering this professional call to action and working to ensure these critical conversations are happening in doctors’ offices, communities, hospitals and health systems across the country,” said Richard J. Baron, MD, president and CEO of the ABIM Foundation.

Since its launch in April 2012, ABIM’s Choosing Wisely campaign has partnered with dozens of national healthcare and consumer groups to develop evidence-based lists of tests and procedures that may be overused in their field.

About the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses: Founded in 1969 and based in Aliso Viejo, Calif., the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) is the largest specialty nursing organization in the world. AACN joins together the interests of more than 500,000 acute and critical care nurses and claims more than 235 chapters worldwide. The organization’s vision is to create a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and their families in which acute and critical care nurses make their optimal contribution.

About the Critical Care Societies Collaborative: The Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) promotes the exchange of ideas about critical care practice and ICU patient care among leaders from medicine, nursing, pharmacy and respiratory therapy. This multidisciplinary member organization includes the American College of Chest Physicians, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, American Thoracic Society and Society of Critical Care Medicine.

About the ABIM Foundation: The mission of the ABIM Foundation is to advance medical professionalism to improve the health care system. We achieve this by collaborating with physicians and physician leaders, medical trainees, health care delivery systems, payers, policy makers, consumer organizations and patients to foster a shared understanding of professionalism and how they can adopt the tenets of professionalism in practice. To learn more about the ABIM Foundation, visit www.abimfoundation.org, read the Medical Professionalism Blog, connect with us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.

About Choosing Wisely®: First announced in December 2011, Choosing Wisely is part of a multi-year effort led by the ABIM Foundation to support and engage physicians in being better stewards of finite health care resources. Participating specialty societies are working with the ABIM Foundation and Consumer Reports to share the lists widely with their members and convene discussions about the physician’s role in helping patients make wise choices. Learn more at www.ChoosingWisely.org.

American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, 101 Columbia, Aliso Viejo, CA 92656-4109;

Phone: (949) 362-2000; Fax: (949) 362-2020;
www.aacn.org; facebook.com/aacnface; twitter.com/aacnme

SOURCE American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN)


Source: PR Newswire



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