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Latest Best Drug Rehabilitation Blog Post Looks at Common Signs of Alcohol Poisoning

February 20, 2014

In its latest blog post, Best Drug Rehabilitation is highlighting some common signs of alcohol poisoning that should be mandatory reading for everyone concerned about their own, a friend’s, or a loved one’s potential or established drinking problem.

(PRWEB) February 20, 2014

In its latest blog post, Best Drug Rehabilitation is highlighting some common signs of alcohol poisoning that should be mandatory reading for everyone concerned about their own, a friend’s, or a loved one’s potential or established drinking problem.

“It’s hard to explain or understand, but some people still don’t realize that the term ‘alcohol poisoning’ is apt: each year, many people literally die from consuming too much alcohol such that the body cannot absorb it through natural processes,” commented Per Wickstrom, Best Drug Rehabilitation’s CEO. “What’s more, while alcohol poisoning occurs in people of all ages – from kids to seniors – most incidents occur in the 35-54 age group.”

According to the Best Drug Rehabilitation blog post, possible signs of alcohol poisoning can include:

  • Extreme confusion: while some degree of disorientation will occur with inebriation, when alcohol levels in the body reach dangerous and potentially fatal levels, individuals can experience extreme confusion that virtually renders them incapable of thinking clearly, speaking coherently, or performing routine activities (e.g. walking across the room, flipping through a book, etc.).
  • Irregular Breathing: high levels of alcohol in the body can interfere with normal breathing patterns, and cause serious respiratory issues. This can be exacerbated in individuals who already have an underlying condition, such as asthma or COPD.
  • Vomiting: while it’s true that many people who haven’t reached the alcohol poisoning threshold will vomit, the real risk is that those who have reached or surpassed that level can fall unconscious and, literally, drown on their own vomit as it is inhaled back into their lungs.
  • Low Body Temperature: Excessive alcohol can diminish the body’s regulating system, which leads to a sudden and dangerous drop in temperature.
  • Seizures: consuming large amounts of alcohol consumed in a short period of time can cause seizures, which if left untreated, can lead to lasting adverse effects.

“It’s also extremely important for us to highlight that people shouldn’t self diagnose or self medicate, nor should they take the information we’re providing as medical advice,” added Per Wickstrom. “Rather, they should use this information to increase their awareness of the potential hazards of alcohol poisoning, and hopefully, reduce their consumption accordingly. What’s more, they should immediately call 911 or emergency services if they suspect someone may be suffering from alcohol poisoning.”

The full text of Best Drug Rehabilitation’s latest blog entitled “Common Signs of Alcohol Poisoning” is available at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/blog/addiction/common-signs-of-alcohol-poisoning/.

For additional information or media inquiries, contact Amber Howe, Executive Director BDR, at (231) 887-4590 or ahowe(at)rehabadmin(dot)com.

About Best Drug Rehabilitation

Best Drug Rehabilitation offers treatment programs, and believes that having family close by during a stay in rehab can make a big difference in whether or not the process is successful. Led by CEO Per Wickstrom, Best Drug Rehabilitation also understands that recovering from an addiction is an intense emotional and physical challenge, and as such provides clients with a comfortable and private space that is safe and free of anxiety. Ultimately, Best Drug Rehabilitation offers recovery geared to the personalized needs of each client, which is an option that makes the chance for long-term success much more likely.

Learn more at http://www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com/.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/Best-Drug-Rehabilitation/02/prweb11599354.htm


Source: prweb



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