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First Implant Of World’s Smallest, Minimally Invasive Cardiac Pacemaker

May 5, 2014
Image Credit: Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation

Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation

The Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation (MHIF) today announced its first implant of the world’s smallest pacemaker: the Medtronic Micra™ Transcatheter Pacing System (TPS) in the Midwest. The device was implanted by Dr. Charles Gornick as part of the global pivotal clinical trial.

One-tenth the size of a conventional pacemaker, and comparable in size to a large vitamin, the Micra TPS pacemaker is delivered directly into the heart through a catheter inserted in the femoral vein. Once positioned, the pacemaker is securely attached to the heart wall and can be repositioned or retrieved if needed. The miniature device does not require the use of wires, known as “leads,” to connect to the heart. Attached to the heart via small tines, the pacemaker delivers electrical impulses that pace the heart through an electrode at the end of the device.

This miniaturized technology is designed to provide patients with the advanced pacing technology of traditional pacemakers via a minimally invasive approach. We are proud that MHIF was selected among an elite group of institutions to take part in this clinical trial. If positive, the results of the trial could potentially benefit many people globally who receive pacemakers each year.

In contrast to current pacemaker implant procedures, the Micra TPS implant does not require a surgical incision in the chest and the creation of a “pocket” under the skin. This eliminates a potential source of complications, and any visible sign of the device. The Medtronic Micra TPS is an investigational device worldwide.


Source: Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation



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