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AllergyEasy® Announces No-shots Immunotherapy to Mitigate Dust Allergies

July 28, 2014

Dust mite allergies tend to spike in July and August. While there are a number of measures allergy sufferers can take to limit their exposure to dust, it is often more advantageous to get treatment for dust allergies and AllergyEasy offers a "no-shots" treatment that's safer and more convenient than shots.

Mesa, AZ (PRWEB) July 28, 2014

For those with dust allergies, home can be a miserable place. Dust mites—a prime cause of dust allergies—commonly settle in mattresses, bedding, and upholstered furniture and elicit allergic reactions including hay fever and asthma.

Dust mites are microscopic insects that feed on the dead skin of pets and humans. Most people shed enough skin each day to keep a million dust mites fat and happy. When a speck of dust is examined under a high power microscope, the decaying bodies and feces of dust mites can be seen.  It is the proteins found in this dust mite "debris" that cause allergic reactions.

Dust mites are most prevalent in July and August because they thrive in warm, humid temperatures. There are a number of steps that the public can take to limit exposure to dust mites such as laundering bedding once a week at high temperatures, encasing mattresses, box springs and pillows in allergen-proof covers, changing furnace filters regularly using high-efficiency particulate air filters, vacuuming frequently, and keeping the moisture in your home low with a dehumidifier. More cautious steps include replacing curtains or blinds with wooden shutters and installing hard flooring in place of carpet.    

While these measures can be helpful, Dr. Stuart Agren, director of a national network of allergy clinics known as AllergyEasy, said that he often sees patients who have spent a lot of money on avoidance measures without seeing a return on their investment.

"You can buy all of the anti-allergen filters and bedding covers, but the fact is, dust is everywhere!" said Dr. Agren.

Agren recommends that patients seek out allergy testing and treatment when dust allergies are affecting their quality of life.

Allergy treatment can "train" the body to stop having allergic reactions to dust particles in the first place. Dust particles are, after all, harmless.  However, when an allergic person encounters them, the immune system mistakenly perceives them as "enemy invaders" and tries to fend them off by releasing chemicals such as histamine into the body. This chemical defense causes a litany of common allergic reactions including itchy eyes, sneezing, nasal congestion, coughing, wheezing, asthma, and more. 

Allergy treatment begins with an allergy serum that helps patients build up an immunity to common allergens (including dust mite proteins) and stop overreacting to them.

Allergy treatment is commonly available through allergy shots or oral allergy drops. Dr. Agren said that many patients are now gravitating to allergy drops because they are safer and more convenient. 

"Because the drops don't have the same risk of anaphylactic reaction associated with shots, they can be taken in the comfort of home rather than at the physician's office," said Dr. Agren. "Given the pace of today's living, this seems to be much easier for people to do on a regular basis." 

For more information on AllergyEasy's treatment options, visit http://www.AllergyEasy.com or call them at 480-827-0038 extension.

AllergyEasy

2033 E Warner Road, Suite 102

Tempe, AZ 85284

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/allergy/immunotherapy/prweb12050002.htm


Source: prweb



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